PlanetGeo

Lava’s All You Need: Preview to Interview with Dr. Andrew Calvert (GeoShort)

June 03, 2021 Season 1
PlanetGeo
Lava’s All You Need: Preview to Interview with Dr. Andrew Calvert (GeoShort)
Chapters
PlanetGeo
Lava’s All You Need: Preview to Interview with Dr. Andrew Calvert (GeoShort)
Jun 03, 2021 Season 1

Today we have a preview to our interview with Dr Andrew Calvert, Scientist in Charge of the California Volcano Observatory, also known as CalVO.

Dr. Calvart first fell in love with volcanoes as a young boy growing up in Idaho when Mount Saint Helens erupted.  This was the first ash sample he ever collected, and he and Chris share this connection to volcanoes and their interest in geoscience. 

In this GeoShort, Dr. Andrew Calvart walks us through a million years of geologic history of Mount Shasta in Northern California.  He has collected samples from every lava flow coming from the volcano.  A million years ago, Shasta didn't exist.  About 700,000 years ago, Shasta began forming.  But, similar to Saint Helens, it fell apart about 400,000 years ago.  He also talks about how episodic Shasta is compared to many of the other Cascadia stratovolcanoes.  It doesn't erupt as often as many of the others.  Despite being very eposodic, it's not very explosive (usually).   Dr. Calvart also explains how the magma beneath Shasta is not as viscous as other stratovolcanoes.





 
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 Instagram: @planetgeocast
 Twitter: @planetgeocast
 Facebook: @planetgeocast
 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJ_A82nOMu0nIvZto6zMPqg
Email: [email protected]

Show Notes

Today we have a preview to our interview with Dr Andrew Calvert, Scientist in Charge of the California Volcano Observatory, also known as CalVO.

Dr. Calvart first fell in love with volcanoes as a young boy growing up in Idaho when Mount Saint Helens erupted.  This was the first ash sample he ever collected, and he and Chris share this connection to volcanoes and their interest in geoscience. 

In this GeoShort, Dr. Andrew Calvart walks us through a million years of geologic history of Mount Shasta in Northern California.  He has collected samples from every lava flow coming from the volcano.  A million years ago, Shasta didn't exist.  About 700,000 years ago, Shasta began forming.  But, similar to Saint Helens, it fell apart about 400,000 years ago.  He also talks about how episodic Shasta is compared to many of the other Cascadia stratovolcanoes.  It doesn't erupt as often as many of the others.  Despite being very eposodic, it's not very explosive (usually).   Dr. Calvart also explains how the magma beneath Shasta is not as viscous as other stratovolcanoes.





 
 ——————————————————
 Instagram: @planetgeocast
 Twitter: @planetgeocast
 Facebook: @planetgeocast
 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJ_A82nOMu0nIvZto6zMPqg
Email: [email protected]