Women's Retirement Radio

Tara Winslow of Tara Winslow Homes - The Atlanta Real Estate Market & Women's Retirement Planning - Episode 21

July 05, 2021 Russ Thornton Season 2 Episode 5
Women's Retirement Radio
Tara Winslow of Tara Winslow Homes - The Atlanta Real Estate Market & Women's Retirement Planning - Episode 21
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Women's Retirement Radio, I'm joined by Tara Winslow of Tara Winslow Homes, an Atlanta professional group specializing in residential real estate.

In our conversation, we discuss Tara's background and why she's so passionate about real estate and its ability to help women and their families build wealth over time. 

And like me, Tara is also a Furman grad.

For more on Tara and Tara Winslow Homes, please check out these resources:

Get in touch and let me know what you think or if you have any questions.

And thank you for listening.

Visit my website to learn more.

Disclosures

Russ Thornton:
Hey, everyone. It's Russ, and welcome to another episode of Women's Retirement Radio. Today, I am super excited to have a friend and local realtor on the phone with us. This is Tara Winslow. Hi, Tara. How're you doing today?

Tara Winslow:
Hey, Russ. Thanks for having me. Doing great.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah, no doubt. Tara, you and I have had the benefit of getting to know each other a little bit over the last few years. We connected, I guess, based on a little shared history, having both [inaudible 00:00:30] Furman. But for those that don't know you, why don't you tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. I'm Tara Winslow with Winslow Home Professionals at Keller Williams Peachtree Road in Brookhaven, and I run a residential real estate team. I'm also a graduate of Furman University, where were you went to school, I know. I've been in residential real estate for almost 10 years. Previous to that, I was in corporate America where I sold technology to middle and large-sized businesses across the State of Georgia, as well as across the country. [crosstalk 00:01:13] It was an interesting switch, and I have been thoroughly enjoying my time in real estate. Yeah, that's where I am right now.

Russ Thornton:
Well, yeah. Exciting times in real estate right now, too, which I'm sure we'll probably talk about here a little bit.

Tara Winslow:
Sure.

Russ Thornton:
Was there a specific catalyst or anything that you can reflect on that led you from technology sales into real estate, or was it just ready for a change of pace or ready to do something different?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. That's a great question. I have always loved real estate, looking at properties, negotiating, and I love negotiating when I was in corporate America contracts. I think ultimately for me, I was really an entrepreneur, and I still am, and being able to run my own business the way that I see it running best was a huge change leaving corporate America, but I've really enjoyed what I'm doing and the change that I made. I have not looked back.

Russ Thornton:
Good for you [inaudible 00:02:21] I know you're busy and seem to be thriving. It sounds like it was a great move, both personally and professionally. I'm happy for you.

Tara Winslow:
Thank you.

Russ Thornton:
I know before we hit record we were talking about ... You've actually got a personal move going on right now.

Tara Winslow:
I do.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah, I appreciate you carving out a little time to talk to us in the midst of packing boxes and getting things organized to move from one home to another.

Tara Winslow:
Right. Thank you. This has been a really great time right now, because being in the business, you sometimes forget the process, the nitty gritty process of moving and purchasing a house and selling the house that you're currently living in. It's a process and you want to do it right, and it does bring on some stress.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah. I haven't done in a while personally, but I remember. Yeah, I know you probably have a dozen things you're juggling right now. Tell us something. What's something interesting about you that maybe most people that know you wouldn't be aware of?

Tara Winslow:
Okay. One of the interesting things is I'm a former athlete, and I love to be outside and exercise and get outdoors. I ran my first and only marathon back in 2001. It was the Walt Disney Marathon, which I had heard it was the most fun. I'm thinking, if I'm going to run 26.2 miles, then let's at least have some fun doing it. That was my first and only marathon. I have done half marathons, and it's what? 20 years ago, and it really does seem like yesterday as I reminisce right this second. But I got my Mickey ears. They give you Mickey ears, or at least back then they did, a medal, when you cross the finish line. It was an extraordinary feeling of passing that finish line when I thought I was not going to get there. But I don't really talk about it. It's just so long ago. But a lot of people don't realize that I was, I guess, a marathon runner, or one-time marathon runner.

Russ Thornton:
Wow. Yeah, that's awesome. You seem pretty clear about your once and only, so it doesn't sound like you're itching to run 26 miles again anytime soon.

Tara Winslow:
I am not. It takes a lot of discipline and determination. For me, it was a process. I'm process-driven I guess, and I joined a running group and I met them. You meet them every Saturday morning, rain or shine or sleep, whatever, and you stay on track and becomes a priority in your life to get through it. I don't think I have the dedication for that anymore right now with running a business and having a six-year-old. Yeah, it's just probably something I'm not going to do again.

Russ Thornton:
You mentioned that you were an athlete. What sports did you play in the past?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. I grew up playing soccer and tennis, and I love my son just started playing soccer. Well, a couple seasons ago, and it just brings back such great memories just being out in the field when I was younger. I played soccer and tennis really, all the way up through high school and some in college. Then I played out tennis in Atlanta, probably until my early 30s. We were at AA. I think AA, went to city, and that's another. When you're disciplined about all that stuff, it takes a lot of time to go play tennis a couple times a week. But yeah, those were my main sports.

Russ Thornton:
Got it. Well, thanks for sharing that. I know that we already covered the fact that you're a realtor, and you run your own residential real estate team there at Keller Williams in Brookhaven. I would be shocked if anybody listening to this isn't familiar with the role a realtor plays in residential real estate. But giving everyone the benefit of the doubt, why don't you explain your work in as simple terms as possible? Think of it like you're explaining it to a five-year-old. Maybe if there's anything you do unique, that you offer or provide unique to your clients that they might not get maybe from another realtor or a real estate professional, maybe you can address that as well.

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. How I feel about real estate is I'm a tenacious realtor, and my job is to help my clients build wealth, and I do that through real estate. In simple terms, I handle all residential, which means condos, townhouses, single family homes, in-town and around the perimeter, and I work with buyers, sellers, and investors. Each person that becomes a client has their own personal goal. In that discussion, in that initial consultation, we talk about what their goal is. Based on that goal, I meet them where they are and I take them where they want to go, however that looks for them. One of the things I think that sets me apart is with my corporate America background.

Tara Winslow:
I started in 1995 when I graduated from Furman, and I learned a lot about sales for over 12 years, and how the process works and having a sense of urgency. Sense of urgency right now in today's market, it's really a skill. If someone is not skilled in real estate right now, it's going to be a tough road for that buyer or seller, and I think that that's one of my best advantages that I bring to the table for any of my clients, is how I know how to get things done and negotiate on their behalf.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. I think you sort of addressed this when you were just explaining what it is you do and how you do it. But what would you say, Tara, is the biggest challenge that you help people address or solve through your work as a realtor?

Tara Winslow:
The biggest challenge, for me, it's about educating my client so that they are comfortable and confident and making decisions on their behalf. Maybe the challenge part is figuring out how much education and information one of my clients needs to make a decision. Some clients choose not to have a lot of information, and they move forward and others need even more. My customizable approach, I try to fit towards each client. Sometimes that may be challenging because I have to feel out and really uncover what someone is looking to do, and sometimes clients don't necessarily have 100% clarity on the direction they want to go, and that will take a minute for us to help them work that out and figure out what direction they want to go in. I would say it's more of a complexity than a challenge. It's just people are complex in their decision making process.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah, but I can see the challenge too, because for a lot of people, buying a home is maybe their largest financial transaction that they've ever entered into. Probably is for a lot of folks. I can see the complexity side and the benefit of your willingness to understand where the client is and where they want to go and how involved or engaged they want to be in the decision making process. But I can also see it being a challenge for a lot of folks too. It sounds like you do a wonderful job of helping to alleviate the anxiety and the financial concerns that are associated with buying a home. I get it.

Tara Winslow:
That's definitely.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. I think that's great. You've been a realtor for a decade plus now. You've worked probably with hundreds upon hundreds of clients over the years. What's your favorite client success story that sticks out in your mind?

Tara Winslow:
Wow. I like to think they're all success stories.

Russ Thornton:
Of course. Of course.

Tara Winslow:
There are some stories that stand out a little bit more in my mind. I had this couple. They are recurring clients of mine, which is, in my world, what we always want, for someone to want to use us again. I believe they're on maybe their second or third house with me, and all along, the husband had been telling me about his mom really needing to sell her house for a number of reasons. She was retired and was having a hard time maintaining the size of her house, and also had gotten herself into some credit card debt. I could see. I had 100% clarity on how I could help her. We helped her build wealth through real estate because once I could finally ... It took many conversations, Russ.

Tara Winslow:
It probably was about two years, and then she finally said, "Okay, Tara, I'm ready to sell my house. Here is all the information. This is where I'm at," and I'm like, "Wow." The success was we were able to downsize her from her current house, purchase, so pay off her loan, pay off her $40,000 in credit card debt, put her in a new home, in a 55 plus community, and she owned the home free and clear. She also was able to put a little over $40,000 in her bank account. She had grandchildren. I was just so excited for her because I'm thinking you went from not having any money for your grandchildren, to now you have a little bit if you wanted to pass on to them just from doing what she did.

Tara Winslow:
She took control and it took a lot of bravery. She was doing this on her own. Her family was with her, and so was I. But I knew it was a big deal for her to make that move. To me, that is one of my huge success stories, and it was a lot. It was a lot for her and it was a long process, and I'm very happy for her because she helped herself, and now she's in a much better situation, financially.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah. What a great story. I imagine not just in a better situation financially, but also emotionally and mentally, and-

Tara Winslow:
Yes.

Russ Thornton:
... she's not having the mortgage and the credit card debt hanging over my head.

Tara Winslow:
Yes.

Russ Thornton:
What a fantastic outcome for her. Something that really sticks out at me is I think a lot of people mistakenly assume working with a realtor is very transactional. We start a dialogue, we find a home or whatever, we sell it, and that's it. But in this instance, you said that process took two years, I think you said?

Tara Winslow:
It did. It did, from the beginning. When I met with her, because her son really was urging her, and that's where you have to meet people with where they are. For whatever reason, she wasn't ready to do it yet, and then it took her that long in the process. Even when buyers are beginning their search, a lot of them start On the Internet, and they start casually looking, and a year goes by, and they're starting to think, "You know what? I think I really want to buy stuff. I really want to move into something new," or whatever it is. It doesn't happen overnight. It does take people time to make decisions. Everyone's timeframe is a little bit different. But yeah, it was a pretty amazing process, I thought.

Russ Thornton:
well, again, I agree, it does take time. You have to meet them where they are. But again, when you add the financial component, and it can be a significant financial decision for most, if not all people. Yeah. Clearly, it's not something you need to go into too quickly or too lightly. That's fantastic you were willing and able to hold her hand and walk her through the process and get her to a point where she was comfortable making a decision that put her in a much better place.

Tara Winslow:
Right. You know what? I did want to ... You mentioned transactional, and that is such a great question that you mentioned. My intention is for this not to be transactional. It's about becoming friends with people. I'm in their life, right? I'm in their life for a process, for a time, a season, and you end up learning so much about them. For me, I don't really look at it as a transaction. Matter of fact, I don't look at that at all. Occasionally sometimes, people just want it to be a transaction, and that's okay if that's what they want to do, and that's fine, too. But it's not for me.

Russ Thornton:
Right. Well, that actually is a beautiful segue into my next question. What's a common misconception about your work that you'd like to address? Maybe it's not as transactional as many people think, but maybe there's something else. What's something that maybe people don't quite understand, or often have a misconception around, related to the work you do and the value that you bring to the table?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. That's a great question, and thanks for asking it. To me, what comes to mind is I think there might be some thinking out there that all we have to do or all we do is put a sign in the yard and sell a house and go to closing. I always hear people wanting to jump into real estate, and to me, it's just not like that. It's a business. I'm running a business, I have people that work for me, and I run a profit and loss, and I send all my info to my CPA. When someone hires me, the least thing is putting a sign in the yard.

Tara Winslow:
It goes back to that whole goals and consultation, and what are we looking to do, and let me tell you about the process and the inspection will be coming up, And let me tell you about the market today and the complexity, that I have never seen the complexity of offers in today's market in the nine and a half years that I've been doing this. When you hire a really great agent, they are doing a lot of things on your behalf and in tandem with you, and talking you through it, and what is the best offer to take today? To me, I guess that's just the misnomer. It's put a sign in the yard, and we're done with our job, and that's far from it.

Russ Thornton:
On those lines, have you found that some of your clients are actually surprised by the level of engagement and the totality of what you do? I've got to imagine that if someone says ... If I said to my neighbor, "Hey, you should reach out to Tara if you're considering real estate transaction," and they might share some of those same misconceptions, or are your clients ever really shocked like, "I didn't know it was this involved?"

Tara Winslow:
Yes, they are. I have several people tell me, "I can never do what you do, and I can never do this job," and it's intense. Right now with the market, and it is a seller's market, and it's an intense market right now. Many of my clients feel like they're married to me in some way, and then we get separated when we're at closing because you know what? You don't have to talk to me every day. But I say that jokingly, but sometimes we don't talk every day. But yeah, I think that they're very surprised, and I think that my clients who do business with me are 100% confident, when we go to closing, they know exactly what's going on. That's how I want them to feel, and I want them to walk away knowing that either, one, we got them the most money, or whatever the goal was that we needed to get for them, they are crystal clear that we did. It goes back to education for me.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. I hear you describe the holistic nature of everything you do for your clients, I'm not shocked to hear that maybe they're often surprised at everything you do for them, and helping them with their real estate. But let me flip that around the other way. What surprised you most about your work in real estate?

Tara Winslow:
Wow. That's a great question. I think, Russ, as I was thinking about some of this last night in preparation, pivoting, it's kind of overused word. Many businesses, small businesses, entrepreneurs like ourselves, had to pivot last year with COVID and what was going on, and how could we adjust and adjust with our clients and help them through this pandemic while purchasing and selling real estate? You had to do a pivot there really quickly. Then [inaudible 00:21:16] everything's status quo, and then all of a sudden, January, February this year comes about, and we're in this gigantic seller's market.

Tara Winslow:
It's been a seller's market, right? Then it just exploded into this new level, and I had to pivot and get ready and do it differently again, because I had to adjust and I had to let my clients know how we are having to adjust to the market. You're adjusting in different ways, depends if you're the buyer or if you're the seller. That's been the surprise this year, is that what's ... That it's exploded, and we make changes and we adjust so that we can best represent our clients.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Definitely not business as usual these days.

Tara Winslow:
Not business as usual.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Maybe take just a moment and share your thoughts about the market. I'm not looking for any kind of prediction or prognostication. But clearly the market is going gangbusters, especially for those that are interested in selling. But of course, the flip side of that is if you sell, you have to turn around and buy, and you're probably buying at inflated prices. Just share your thoughts about the market, and maybe what's driving this. Is there something out in the future that maybe has to happen for things to maybe settle back down or some steam blows out of this market, or is this the new normal for the foreseeable future?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. Well, I have a couple thoughts, and all of those are great questions packed together. I will say jokingly that I have never had a client go homeless, okay? If we're selling their house, I do ... Another piece of legwork that I do when you're my buyer client is searching and calling and looking for a property that's not currently on the market, which most people don't even think that a realtor would do that, and a lot of them don't. I think it's just my cold calling background, corporate America. But we got to find a place, a new house and locate one, right? For my selling clients. That's one thing that I do every day. Matter of fact, it's on my calendar and time block to make those phone calls to find an unlisted property for one of my sellers selling their house.

Tara Winslow:
Another comment that I have is I will use myself as an example. I know, without a doubt, today's market right now is the best time for anyone considering selling their house to do so now. I know it. I know what so much as we even started the phone call, I purchased my own house. I closed on my own house back in April. Do I think that I bought it at the high and that we're going to experience the turbulence we experienced back in 2008 and 2009? It's a completely different set of variables that are going on in today's world that were not going on back then, which was the inflation of the mortgages and more of the lending process that had a major breakdown, and that's what happened [inaudible 00:24:55]

Tara Winslow:
This isn't a Microsoft ball. This is just economists, national and international economists, that this market is not looking like it's going to settle down. From my perspective, I have a new house and I also have a low interest rate. To me, it offset. Additionally, Russ, this is what I think. Personally, I was in multiple offers. I know how to win multiple offers, I won it for myself. I personally paid a lot over list price, and in my mind, I tell my sellers or my buyers, you got to be comfortable with what your offer is going to be and you're going to have to be okay if it doesn't appraise, and that means you're going to bring extra money to the table, and this is all in the consultation, right?

Tara Winslow:
Set the stage before we get there so they can think about this and make the best decision for themselves. You know what? I ended up getting my own house appraised at the high price that I got it at, and I will consider ... I know that it will continue to go up in price. They're expecting millions of people to move into Atlanta over the next five years. The inventory is still really low and people have to find housing. I feel really good about my decision, and I support my decision based on this is how I educate my clients too. I took my own advice on that.

Russ Thornton:
Well [inaudible 00:26:39] I think it's great that you can speak, not just experientially as a realtor working with clients, but having just gone through the process in the midst of this, for lack of a better word, crazy real estate market. I appreciate that perspective. I think that's helpful. Tara, when you have clients, whether they're sellers or buyers, or even investors, I've got imagine this doesn't happen often. But in the event that someone elects not to take your advice or to go a different route, what would you say prevents people from following your advice or relying on your expertise when dealing with real estate?

Tara Winslow:
How do I handle if they don't ... if they choose to maybe go at their own way?

Russ Thornton:
Not how you handle it. I'm wondering if you could get inside a client's mind that has said, "Hey, Tara, I understand what you're telling me, but I think I should do this," or, "I know you're telling me to offer list plus 15%, but I think I should offer list plus or minus X," if you could get into those people's minds, what do you think maybe prevents them from accepting your advice or thinking they know better, or whatever the case may be? That's what I'm wondering.

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. Asking your buyer to put in an offer $55,000 over list price ... Quite frankly, I've heard ... I have not had this experience, but I'm in some masterminds. Some people at over a million, people are putting in over $100,000 higher than sales list price. It's a lot of money, and I get it. I get it. Part of the consultation that I have is let's talk about what we need to expect you to consider doing putting in an offer. This, again, is upfront before we start really showing houses. Because if someone says, "Tara, I'm not comfortable putting in anything more than sales price," I think that that's really great that they know themselves so well, and this may not be the best time for them to purchase a house and get into the real estate market.

Tara Winslow:
The last statistic that came out in April for the Atlanta market is that sales price is 7% to 10% over the list price on average. Sometimes, Russ, people may not believe you have to go a certain amount that high, and you really have to help them get clarity. Does that mean you want to try it once and really see, or do you think that maybe this isn't the best time, or maybe you're just ready to go for it? It's different. There's a spectrum of answers there, and that's something that I can help people flush out. I think also showing them I have statistics quarterly and monthly statistics. It's boring to look at for people who don't like numbers, but it gives you the statistics of what the market is doing at a granular level. Sometimes when people say, "Oh, wow, I see that 115% over list price." Sometimes people just have to see that data, and then they're okay with it.

Russ Thornton:
Right. Hearing you explain that, I also wonder if it's really just ... If it's also potentially the need to reset expectations. Let's say somebody comes to you and says, "Tara, I want to buy a house, and my budget is $500,000," but you know that houses are going 7% to 10% above that, 10% is 550, so maybe they actually need to lower their budget to 450 to allow them to bid up a little bit higher above asking, if they're willing to.

Tara Winslow:
That is so perfect. That's exactly the advice that I would give my client, if their budget's 500,000. We can't look at the top of 500,000. They're probably going to love the house that's listed at 499, but it's going to sell higher. To stay within someone's budget, which is important to me because they're telling me that's important to them, and this is again done up front, we already know they've been pre-qualified and we know what they're comfortable with spending. Then we'll base what they're comfortable spending on and we'll lower that sales price. A lot of times, there's a little bit of a sticker shock if someone has to go down to 450 when they really want to be at 500. But the only way really to play the game is you're going to have to go in at 450 and then use that extra money for the escalation in your offer. Price escalation.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. We could probably actually dive pretty deep down this rabbit hole. But I think the whole psychology and decision making around financial matters, a primary home being a great example is just fascinating. Clearly the money's a key component, but it's not the only component. I think there's elements of ego like, "I want to be in a house that I'd be proud to have my family and friends come visit. I want to be in the right or the best school district for my children, if they're public schools." Things like that. I think there's just a ... You clearly know this better than I do when it comes to real estate, but I think it's fascinating to think about all of the elements that go into making a real estate decision. Because I see some of those similar elements come to the surface all the time when I'm working with my clients doing financial planning and investment management, things like that. Yeah, I just find it fascinating.

Tara Winslow:
I think my clients are doing a great job when they're talking to you as their wealth advisor about letting you know, first off, "Hey, I'm looking to sell, I'm going to buy a new house, and can we talk about budget and can we look at my portfolio prior to me doing that?" I think your position and job function is as important as the mortgage lender. You're right about a lot of different factors that go in to one making a decision. To me, I always start with the money because as long as someone's comfortable with their finances, then the other pieces start to fall in line. But the price will essentially dictate the location and area, particularly right now. I think it's great when your clients go to you first and let you know what they're planning on doing, and you can help them from the financial and see things that I'm not going to see as clearly as you are because that's what you do for a living.

Russ Thornton:
Right, right. Yeah. I appreciate that. But yeah, I just think it's a ... I think about considering all the facets that go into any financial decision, but certainly one as big as a home. I think it's just endlessly interesting to think about and to discuss. Tara, we both went to Furman. Let's say a Furman student, let's say a junior or senior Furman approached you and said, "Hey, Tara, I've heard a little bit about what you do and I'm very interested in real estate," and they're interested in getting into real estate, whether that's being a realtor or on the finance side or something along those lines, what advice or guidance would you give to maybe a student that's interested in learning more or potentially pursuing a career in real estate?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. I think it's fantastic. I do have conversations with Furman alumni and those graduates. I'm actually doing that these days. I think it's great to get in at an early age. I got in at maybe the middle part of my career. Would I do it again at an earlier age? Yeah. I was a little nervous about making that transition from corporate to entrepreneurship. If they're already knowing that they are an entrepreneur and want to do a small business, I think it's fantastic to start when you're that young because that's the time to go at it. If you make mistakes, it's okay and it's a great way to grow. I'm all for it. I'm always into speaking to younger ... Not just at Furman, in the Atlanta area, and helping them with any career path or wanting to have a discussion about a career path. I think that's fantastic. They're doing a great service to themselves.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. I'm always interested to hear people's thoughts on that question. I guess it's an indirect way of also saying if you knew then what you know now. It sounds like you would have jumped in with both feet earlier if you maybe had the opportunity to do it over again. I don't think there's any more of a ringing endorsement that you can give for your chosen work than that. That's pretty cool. Tara, when you ... This is Women's Retirement Radio. Virtually everything I do revolves around retirement for women and their families. When you think of the word retirement, personally, what comes to mind for you?

Tara Winslow:
Arizona comes to mind for me. Let's see, my son is six. I had my son a little bit later in life, and he'll be going ... Well, we got another 14. Well, maybe a little bit less than that. But yeah, for me, personally, Russ, I have been planning for retirement. I didn't really realize I was planning for retirement when I started my first job at the Coca Cola company eons ago. However, over the years, as you even know better than I do, everything compounds. Your finances compound. Over the past 10 years, I've been really focused on my retirement and what I'm going to do.

Tara Winslow:
This is how I see things. If my son chooses, he'll go to college and I'll head to Arizona. I love that weather. I will still be working, probably as a business coach in real estate and running my real estate team, and at the same time, I'll be doing it knowing that I don't really have to, if I don't want to. To me, that's the best of retirement. Continue to work, helping others, grow others, and you really don't have to worry about any of the finances or financials coming in, if you don't want to.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. It sounds like another way to think of what you just described as work optional.

Tara Winslow:
Yes.

Russ Thornton:
Which I think a lot of people love that idea where they can continue to work if they want to, or maybe they can pursue something that they find maybe more fulfilling than what they're doing right now. But it's purely on a if-I-want-to basis, which I think is great. There's something you said. If you did relocate to Arizona, when your son's maybe getting ready to potentially go to college, did you say that you anticipate continuing to manage your local real estate team from Arizona?

Tara Winslow:
Well, at that point, I would like to have someone take over the position of running the team where I can be remote and I have a really great person who is running Winslow Home Professionals. Keller Williams, where I reside, is all over and I could possibly go into some position over in Arizona. I think the sky's the limit on that piece of it. But my hometown is here in Atlanta, Russ. I grew up Here, and I'd like to still have a good stronghold here in Atlanta, because I grew up here. It's important. I love the city. I love the city.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah, I was just curious. I didn't know if with technology, and I'm not familiar with real estate regulations and who can practice as a realtor, where, and if that's the jurisdiction, or whatever. I just didn't know if you would have the option to continue to be plugged into and work with your current Keller Williams team, even if you're on the other side of the country. It sounds like you could, and maybe in a reduced capacity.

Tara Winslow:
Right. You can get your license. You continue to keep your license current in the state that you reside, and if you move to a different state, then you can get your license and study for the exam in that state that you move to.

Russ Thornton:
Got it. Got it. Interesting. Well, it sounds like you've got a pretty clear picture of where you're heading for retirement. Going back to your earlier comments around the value of clarity and understanding what a buyer or seller is looking to get out of a real estate transaction, I think clarity is really key, perhaps above all else, and I think the clarity that you have around your own ideas around retirement, I think is really refreshing.

Tara Winslow:
Thank you.

Russ Thornton:
Well, I think that's-

Tara Winslow:
From you, the expert. I appreciate that.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. It sounds pretty exciting. Along the ... Continuing on the recurrent theme, in your opinion and from your perspective, what's one of the biggest challenges women face in particular, when they're planning for retirement?

Tara Winslow:
I guess probably the biggest thing that I see when I work with women in real estate is they don't realize their brilliance and their capacity to take on their retirement themselves, and really ... I'm not saying all women at all, and I don't mean that. I think that everyone has the capacity to take themselves where they want to go in their retirement, and I look to empower anybody who wants to be shown the way or put on the path or needing support or whatever they need to do that. I like to be one of those women who help women.

Russ Thornton:
Well, part B of the same question, how do you see your work in real estate impacting women and their families as they look ahead or plan to make the transition into retirement? I think you've already addressed it in some manner, but I'd love to get your thoughts on that.

Tara Winslow:
Well, I think that it goes back to building wealth in real estate. Someone is building wealth when they purchase real estate, and they're building wealth if they choose to sell it too, and they can put it in other places. I think that that's one thing. I think from the whole financial point of view, I think that there's a lot of different avenues someone can go down in the real estate market, including investing. I have investors right now who continue to purchase properties for long term gain, and the rental market is huge, and we haven't even touched on that. But goodness. There's a lot of different avenues for women in their families to build wealth, and you can do it pretty quickly in real estate. It doesn't have to be thinking, "Oh, it's going to take me 10 years to get to X, Y, Z, in terms of wealth." You can do that today, and that's the real benefit and motivation, right? You can start today and build wealth for yourself.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah. I think that's great. I think that, again, real estate's clearly not my forte, but it is yours, and I think that opens up another interesting avenue for women or their families to consider as they're looking at, not just their retirement plan, but their overall financial plan and decision making. I think that's a great perspective, and I think that hopefully will help open some of our listeners' minds to the choices and options they have as they're looking to plan for their own futures.

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. Yes. [crosstalk 00:44:44]

Russ Thornton:
I'm sorry. Go ahead.

Tara Winslow:
No, I was just saying I am in agreement with you that that's excellent.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Right now you've got a real estate team that you're running, busy with that. You've got a six-year-old son, and on top of everything else, you're moving right now, literally right now. But let's step back and imagine that you got an hour or two all to yourself. I'm not sure how often that happens, if at all. But if you had an hour or two all to yourself, how do you most enjoy spending your time when you've got the time?

Tara Winslow:
My time, that hour or two, will be at the spa. If it has to be a local spa, it will be natural body and I will go get my massage, my 90-minute massage, and pedicure. If I can manage to eke out a weekend, it will be one of my favorite spas in Arizona in Scottsdale, which is ... I just love being there. That's how I relax, and or at the pool, under the sun with a bunch of sunscreen on, but near the pool in the sun. That is the way I like to relax.

Russ Thornton:
Well, that sounds like a way to relax. Yeah, that's nice. As we start to wrap up our conversation today, Tara, if there were just one thing that our listeners could take away from our discussion today, what would you want that one thing to be?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. The one thing would be if you're considering selling and wanting to take advantage of the market, and you have some concerns or questions or you're not sure the path that you would take, reach out to me. We can do a consultation over the phone just to help you flesh it out. It may be that that is for you to stay where you are, and that may be the best decision. But just to have a conversation, excuse me, a conversation instead of swirling it around in your head. Just reach out and we can set that up, and that will help you.

Russ Thornton:
Well, I think that's a super generous offer. With that in mind, let's say someone does want to reach out to you and have a conversation. What's the best way for people to get in touch or learn more about you and your team and your services?

Tara Winslow:
Yeah. I'm online at Winslow Home Professionals, tarawinslowhomes.com. I'm in LinkedIn, I'm in Facebook, Instagram, or you can email me at [email protected], and it will come right to me and we can set up some time from there.

Russ Thornton:
Right. We'll be sure to include all of Tara's links and websites into the show notes so people can have that at hand if they do want to reach out. Tara, this has been fun. I always enjoy our conversations and [crosstalk 00:47:53]

Tara Winslow:
Likewise. Thanks, Russ.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah, I think this has been super or will be super illuminating for our listeners. I appreciate your willingness to jump on and do this podcast with me in the midst of moving and packing boxes and everything that you've got going on right now. Before we wrap it up, anything else you want to add? Anything else you want to touch on that maybe we didn't address?

Tara Winslow:
I just wanted to thank you again, and thank you to who is listening out there, and I'm happy to be of service and just have a conversation, and I wish everyone well in the summertime months too. It should be a fun summer with some of the changes going on in our world right now.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Let's certainly hope so. Well, thanks again, Tara. This has been great. Thanks to everyone out there for listening. Again, this is Russ Thornton, Women's retirement Radio. Look forward to catching up with you on our next episode.