Women's Retirement Radio

Kaye Ginsberg, Founder of Peace of Mind Transitions - Helping People Downsize, Organize & Move - Episode 34

October 04, 2021 Russ Thornton Season 2 Episode 18
Women's Retirement Radio
Kaye Ginsberg, Founder of Peace of Mind Transitions - Helping People Downsize, Organize & Move - Episode 34
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Women's Retirement Radio, I'm joined by Kaye Ginsberg.

If you - or a loved one - have ever dealt with the potential overwhelm of downsizing and moving after being in your home for a number of years, you probably wished you had someone to simply take care of everything for you.

Well, I'm happy to introduce you to that someone... Kaye Ginsberg of Peace of Mind Transitions.

From the Peace of Mind Transitions website:

"Are you worried about helping your parent move when you live in another state or are faced with your own time constraints? You may be wondering how to start the whole move process.

Peace of Mind Transitions personally understands how difficult this change can be and we’re here to help make it as easy as possible!"

For more on Kaye and Peace of Mind Transitions, please check out these resources:

Get in touch and let me know what you think or if you have any questions.

And thank you for listening.

Visit my website to learn more.

Disclosures

Russ Thornton:
Hi, everyone. It's Russ and welcome to another episode of Women's Retirement Radio. I'm excited today to be joined by Kaye Ginsberg. Kaye's the founder of Peace of Mind Transitions. She has created a really interesting and I would argue, super important and valuable business. And so I'm really happy that she's joining us today and we're going to get to share a little bit about who she is and what she does. Kaye, welcome.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Thank you, Russ. Happy to be here and I'm excited to talk to you and talk about my company.

Russ Thornton:
Like I said, I'm excited as well. Why don't we start Kaye, by you just telling us a little bit about yourself personally.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Okay. Well, I was raised as with my father in the Air Force, so people said we were like Air Force brats. We moved about every four years all over the U.S. and lived in Germany as well. And while I didn't love having to get uprooted every four years growing up, I now appreciate a lot more. I think it made me more resilient and able to try new things. When we were living in Maryland, outside of Washington, D.C., when I was graduated from high school, I went to college and the University of Kansas, because my parents kept their residency in Kansas when we were moving around.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And I majored in advertising and journalism and decided that I was going to go to the big city of New York after I graduated, which I did. Worked in some ad agencies, ultimately moved into publishing. I was marketing director of Condé Nast Traveller magazine. I met my husband, who's a New Yorker. We had our first child and actually our second one as well. And we were commuting from Connecticut and it was just long hours of working and commuting, and he had a great opportunity for a job here in Atlanta.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And so we moved down here and I took the opportunity to take some time off from working and was a full-time mom, raising our three kids, which I feel very privileged to have been able to do. It was just super volunteer and doing a lot of things like that. And about six years or so ago, my mom needed to move into senior living. My father had passed away suddenly. She was showing signs of dementia, not able to live at home anymore.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And the community that we moved her into in Maryland referred us to a great company that were senior move managers that helped us with the entire move process. And I just thought it was the most helpful, amazing service add I just got interested in it. Started helping some of my friends. My husband convinced me to start my own company, so I say I'm an accidental entrepreneur. I started Peace of Mind Transitions.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Thought it would just be me and a few friends, and over the past five years, we've just grown to a much larger company, because as you said, there's just so much demand and so much need, and we just love what we do.

Russ Thornton:
Wow. Hey, thanks for sharing all that. I think we could probably spend all of our time talking about your travels growing, up your work at Condé Nast, and some of the other things you shared, so maybe we'll have to have you back for a part two at some point. But-

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yeah, I'd love that.

Russ Thornton:
But I'd really like to learn more about your company and more generally about senior move management. For our listeners, could you just maybe explain a little bit more about generally what that means and maybe give an example or two of where it might make sense for someone to reach out to you and Peace of Mind Transitions?

Kaye Ginsberg:
That's great. One of the biggest challenges we have as an industry is people just don't know we even exist. I'm actually a member of the National Association of Senior and Specialty Move Managers. There are companies all across the U.S., in Canada, even in Europe and Australia, so it's really growing. What we do is we help older adults and their families through the entire relocation process, and that can include downsizing and organizing prior to the move, literally going through cabinets and closets or addicts and garages to sort what you're going to keep and what you won't be keeping.

Kaye Ginsberg:
We have an interior designer on staff who does floor planning in interior design, so we know exactly what you currently have that's going to fit in the new space. Our team does all the packing because we pack, so that when we are unpacking, it's very organized, which is a little bit different than a moving company. We do work with local moving companies because they are the ones that do all that heavy lifting and they transport everything from one location to the next.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And then we're there to manage that process and unpack. And we completely unpacked the home and set up, organize the closets and the cabinets, and hang the art and wall-mount TVs, and hang window treatments, whatever needs to be done, we can make it happen. So literally our clients can leave a completely settled home and walk into their brand new, completely settled home, which is just a really big deal.

Kaye Ginsberg:
People that should think about reaching out to us are anyone who's just even getting ready or starting to think about downsizing, because most of the time we're working with people that have lived in a home, a big home for a long time, and they may be to a condo or townhouse, or a 55 plus community, or some senior living. We work with a wide range of clients, but it's anyone who's feeling overwhelmed by the thought of moving.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And we do help people that aren't seniors occasionally, and it's usually family members of the people we help move first, but that's really where our heart lies because moving is stressful for anyone at any age. But when you're older and you're having to leave behind memories and a house you've lived in for 42 years, that can be extra stressful. And so we're here to help people through that whole process and guide them through that.

Kaye Ginsberg:
We do a little counseling along the way, some shoulders to cry on occasionally. But it's just very rewarding for us because we feel like we've really made a difference in our client's lives when they've gone through this process.

Russ Thornton:
Well, clearly you're doing something right. If after moving an older adult or a senior, if their maybe adult children or other family or friends reach out to you for help with their move, even if they're not squarely in that senior age range, I think that speaks volumes to the value and the quality of the work that you guys are delivering. I'm glad you mentioned that, that's pretty cool.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yeah. And actually, I would say, 98% of our business is referrals. The senior communities that we work in know us and pass our name out to their new residents coming in, real estate agents. People we've worked with are the ones that pass our name along the most, so to me, that says a lot too, is that it's almost all referrals.

Russ Thornton:
Of the referrals you do receive, is that typically the senior who's like maybe late 70s, 80s, or older and they reach out and say, "Kaye, I've got to move. I need help, I don't know where to start"? Or is it more often their adult children who might be in their 50s or 60s saying like, "Hey, my mom and/or my dad, we've got to tackle this big project. I'm working full time and I've got a family, so I need some help"? Or is it a little bit of both?

Kaye Ginsberg:
It really is a little bit of both. I'm just thinking about the phone calls I got yesterday and it was almost half and half. Some are adult children saying, "I need help, for my parent." Or we're working with a 93-year-old man who's completely in charge, and fit, and mentally and physically, and we're doing a move for him and his wife. So it's a really varied and that's what makes it so interesting is every day, every move is different.

Russ Thornton:
I'm just curious, most of these situations, do the people that reach out to you already know where they want to move or do you guys ever get involved in like helping them figure out a, like what part of town, or maybe even what specific home... I know you guys aren't realtors clearly, but can you guys help them in that decision-making process as well, like figuring out if they are capable of living independently versus going to maybe some kind of senior community or assisted living scenario?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Actually there's a whole industry that helps people make those decisions. They're senior placement advisors and some of them are also realtors, so they might specialize more in the 55 plus communities and others also specialize in knowing about the senior living communities themselves. I think it's really important to use a professional in that industry because they're keeping up with all the data on the different communities. They'll know what the price points are. They'll know who's negotiating.

Kaye Ginsberg:
They'll know if anybody has licensing violations, whose staff is turning over and it might not be a good time to move. I know a little bit, I just see a little piece of that, but I don't have the whole picture. And so I refer people that aren't sure where they're moving to those placement, people that I know and trust that can help people make those decisions, because it's really important. Moving again, it's not easy, it's not inexpensive. You want to make sure you've chosen where you're going and are making a good choice in where you want to go.

Russ Thornton:
That makes sense. Sounds to me like whether you're working with a local moving company or you're bringing on other complimentary professionals to help your clients make the most informed decisions based on their circumstances or situation, it sounds like you guys really through both your staff and your services, as well as other people that you guys can vet and bring to the table. It sounds like it's pretty end in service.

Kaye Ginsberg:
It really is. I think it's really important for people to realize is there's a whole senior care industry that just keeps growing. If you think about the fact that I think it's 10,000 people turn 65 every day in the U.S. This huge bubble of population that's aging, there are all these companies like senior move managers, like placement people, people like you that are specializing in helping financially, make the right plans that...

Kaye Ginsberg:
There are just a lot of people out there to help people going through this process and it's really important to ask questions. Everyone in the industry, one thing I really like about the senior care industry is that people really are in it for the right reasons to help people. And we all with each other and know who to go to. Again, if it's something we don't do, I probably know someone who does it that I can refer you to. And that's how people come to us as well.

Russ Thornton:
In fact I'm reminded just a few episodes ago, we had Lisa Kaufman on who's a geriatric care manager.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yep, mm-hmm (affirmative).

Russ Thornton:
And it's just so interesting to discover all of the specialty services and subject matter experts in these relatively specific service providers or addressing specific needs within the senior community specifically. And clearly you and your company, Kaye are providing a huge service for something that's super important as you pointed out yourself. Regardless of age or circumstances, a move is a big deal. It can be overwhelming and quickly take on a life of its own.

Russ Thornton:
And I think that's probably only magnified as people are older. They've maybe been in the same house for years, if not decades. They've got a lot of stuff they've accumulated. I think people can probably identify with or pretty familiar with what's involved there. But from your perspective, in your experience, what would you say is the biggest challenge that you and Peace of Mind Transitions, help people address or solve?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yeah, I think there's two big challenges and I alluded to it a little bit earlier, the first one and you just mentioned it. A senior move, when people are moving at a later age is often predicated by another stressful event like the death of a spouse or a change in mental or physical health. So it's a really difficult time, so I feel like we are dealing with people's emotions and a lot more than you would in a typical move. We have discussions like, "This is the last move I'm ever going to make. I'm leaving this home with all these memories."

Kaye Ginsberg:
And so we spend a lot of time, I've done some training with our staff to really help work with people and just bring the compassion and understanding that needs to happen when you're going through a move like that. And the other big issue right now is what to do with the things that aren't going with them. We're in an interesting phase right now in the U.S. that there are two generations downsizing at the same time, because we're all living longer. So we have people in their 80s and 90s that are moving into even independent living for the first time.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And that generation saved all of their parents' things, their furniture, their china. They loved getting it and they want to pass down. But we have people in their 60s and 70s, empty nesters, they've been successful, they filled their own homes, they've accumulated things. They don't really want all the things that might be coming their way from their parents. And then we have the millennial children and grandchildren who are much more minimalist and don't want a lot of stuff in their house.

Kaye Ginsberg:
The problem becomes what happens when family doesn't want the three sets of china that the grandparent has been saving from her family, her husband's family, her own china. What do you do with the big furniture, the heavy dining room tables, and the china cabinets, and the big TV armoires that aren't popular anymore? And then with the pandemic last year, people were downsizing who were just at home and that was what they were doing. So there's just this flood of things on the market.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And so people spent a lot of money on furniture and they're not going to get that same price point back or even be able to sell it. Big, beautiful desks, sometimes we even have trouble donating them. That's really a big challenge that we have when we work with our clients is finding a new home for things that aren't going with them. The estate sale companies, you look around, there are probably 20 estate sales going on around your neighborhood each weekend, and the consignment stores are feeling overwhelmed and they're very specific about what they'll take.

Kaye Ginsberg:
We're just trying to be creative and get things to people who need it, who don't have as much and get things donated and reused.

Russ Thornton:
I'm reminded when you and I met and had coffee a few weeks back. I think we spent a few minutes talking about that very issue. In fact, I think I might've mentioned, I think my mother-in-law has multiple sets of china that she assumes that my wife and her other two daughters want, and I don't think that's the case. And that's just one small example. And then I'm also reminded too, I don't know the stats, but I think the self storage industry is like... continues to grow at a blistering pace, which just speaks to the fact that people are accumulating stuff or stuff being handed down and they don't have a place for it.

Russ Thornton:
I'm glad you mentioned that because I think that's a bigger challenge that maybe many people would recognize. And I suspect, you could probably speak to this, but I suspect that it's probably helpful to have an objective third party like you guys come in and help through that process, as opposed to the adult kids having to basically maybe disappoint at some level their mom or their dad and just telling them like, "No, we don't want all this stuff." I got to think that's probably a delicate conversation to have.

Russ Thornton:
But I would think there's probably a lot of value in you guys being involved and almost being able to serve as a quasi-mediator in figuring all that out and navigating that conversation.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yeah, absolutely. Having an independent third party definitely makes a difference in a lot of cases. And just back to the storage units for one minute. I listened to a podcast the other day, and they said that there are more storage units in the U.S. than there are Starbucks and McDonald's franchises. That just proves your point, that was shocking to me.

Russ Thornton:
[crosstalk 00:18:36]

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yeah, that's crazy. But going back to that independent person in the mix, and I'm sure you see that in your industry too, there's all sorts of different family dynamics going on. People's feelings from something mom said 20 years ago resurface when you're trying to divide up things among the family, so we do try to come in and be impartial and we're always on our client's side and trying to do what's best for them and just keep everything calm around them. And try to make help people make decisions that are right for them and let the rest of the family dynamics play off in the background ,and let's just make this move as easy as possible for the people that are moving.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Well, I think we've clearly made the case that this is a a big deal. It can be challenging at a minimum, more likely overwhelming in many cases. So instead of just focusing on the issue or arguably the problem, why don't you share with us one or two of your favorite client success stories that you've experienced over the last few years?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yeah. One of our favorite clients is a woman whose husband has Parkinson's. She's been having to make all these decisions for the family independently on her own. Her husband's kind of helpful, but not what he used to be in terms of support and that kind of thing. And they were living in a house that had a lot of stairs. They just made the decision to move to a senior living community, into a cottage. It was all one level that wasn't going to be an issue for them with stairs, and that she could get some support and help and have other people around her.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And so I met with her and I told her about all our services and how we could get her moved quickly, and that we'd get it all set up, and that we'd literally pack one day, move to the next and you'd be able to move in. She tells me afterwards that she was very skeptical, but we came highly recommended from the community, so she was like, "I need the help. I'll just go with these people and see what they do." We came in and we did... We always packed the day before the move, so we were packing.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And she was like, "Who knew that packing china could be so much fun?" And it wasn't like we were throwing a wild and crazy party, but it's just a group of mostly women that all enjoy being with each other, enjoy our clients, like what we do. So it just was a pleasant experience for her. It wasn't just a bunch of strange guys. Certainly guys coming in in packing. And the next day, the movers came, loaded, the truck, drove over to the community.

Kaye Ginsberg:
She popped in probably in the middle of the day, saw total chaos because there were probably four movers unloading furniture, four or five people on my team unpacking and hanging art, get everything done. She said, she walked away as like, "Yeah, never happening. They're not going to be done today." She came back up probably about five o'clock and we were pulling the last boxes out the last, packing paper, vacuuming to make sure the floors were clean. Pictures were on the wall, cabinets were organized. The bathroom was set up.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Literally the beds were made, lamps were on and she just burst into tears. And she just still says to this day, she couldn't believe that we did it in one day and was just so incredibly happy. That's really what we want to do is make that move and make it so easy that you literally walk out of one home and into the next. But what I also love about the story is we also help, like I mentioned before with our clients, with managing what to do with what's left.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And so she was lucky because they're moving into a cottage, so they took more furniture than you might into an apartment. Her family actually took some furniture, so there wasn't enough left for an estate sale. But we have connections with people who maybe have a booth at an antique store or do consignments or whatever. So I had one of our guys come in and he went through her stuff and he found a sterling silver butter dish that he ended up selling for $800, which none of us ever expected. But it was along some other things.

Russ Thornton:
For a butter dish.

Kaye Ginsberg:
A butter dish of butter dish. Yes. She was so excited about that on top of everything else, and I can't promise that kind of result for everybody. I always hate throwing that story out there, because then everyone expects that. But it just shows that we take the time, we try to get the right people in to help you. We're going to not just toss everything out the door. If there's a butter dish to be found, we're going to have someone to find it. We just take that kind of care with our clients.

Kaye Ginsberg:
That's a great story. I love working with women in their late 80s and 90s. They're so full of character and great stories. I've learned so much history of Atlanta through them. My husband loves telling this story. We were moving a woman who was 99 at the time. This was a year ago. She's still with us, I just saw her recently. And she lives in a community that had to do some repair work, so we had to go through and move people out of their apartments for a few days, and then back in.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And we took pictures of how everything was exactly set up, and we put everything back exactly where it was. She called me after we moved back in and said, "I'm missing a stool that was in my closet and my computer's not hooked up." I actually grabbed my husband because he's much more tech savvy than I am. We went over in the evening and I found her stool. It was actually right where it was in the closet before. She just couldn't see it. And then my husband was hooking up her computer and it came up with 30,000 emails that she had on her computer.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And she's like, "I need my email every day because this is super important to me." So we got her all hooked up. But I just love that she is 99, she's now 100 and still loves her emails and needed to be connected with her outside world. It's really just a lot of the people that we come in contact with every day. Again, just interesting, lovely people that we feel like we're, for a brief moment, a part of the family.

Russ Thornton:
Thanks for sharing that. Something I want to really underscore, which you've mentioned several times, but you also highlighted in that first story is that you don't just pack up and move people, but you also unpack them. And I want to be very, very clear that unpacking does not mean opening boxes and setting things on the kitchen counter. As you've told me before, you'll put things in cabinets, you'll put their silverware in the doors. To the extent that they want you to and are willing, you guys will basically make their new home move in-ready. Correct?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Absolutely. And I like to say your pantry will look like it came out of the container store because we get everything super organized, and your linen closet will have all the nice towels folded neatly, we make the bed. We talk to our clients before we do the kitchen to say, "Where do you like your dishes? Near the microwave and near glass or near the refrigerator?" Whatever it is. We put in pull-out drawers a lot of times because some of our older clients are not very tall and have limited mobility. They can't reach very high on the cabinets above the counter.

Kaye Ginsberg:
So we'll put in pull-out drawers in the cabinets and, why can't you have your plates in a pull-out drawer instead of up in the cabinet? It's easier for you to reach. We'll do a lot of things like that, really understand what our clients needs are, how we can make their lives better. We'll adjust the height of closet shelving and rods, so it's easier for people to reach, or if someone's in a wheelchair now. All those things, we take in to account and literally, like you said, unpack and truly set up the new apartment.

Kaye Ginsberg:
A moving company is going to tell you they pack and unpack, but the way they pack is they want to bring as many big boxes as they can and fill them up. They don't really care where anything is going in the new place. And then if they're going to unpack, they just take everything out. Like you said, put it on the counter, put it on the floor, and take all the packing materials away, which is fine. That's what they do.

Kaye Ginsberg:
But when we pack, we use smaller boxes and everything in that box is going to the same location, and it's clearly labeled. We might say, "China cabinet, right-hand side, third shelf." So, when we come to unpack, that's going back into that china cabinet, right-hand side, third shelf. After we dust the shelves off, I say, "Everything looks so much nicer after we've been there because everything's been cleaned. It hasn't necessarily been dusted in the past 20 years."

Kaye Ginsberg:
And then again, organize all the cabinets, all the closets, and you literally walk in and just start enjoying living in your new home. You're not surrounded by boxes.

Russ Thornton:
And you mentioned you're Atlanta like I am. Do you and your company primarily serve the immediate Atlanta area?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Yep, we cover the whole Atlanta metro area, but we're part of this national association. So we work with clients that might be moving from another state to Atlanta, and we can partner with NASMM, our national organization, another member, so they can do the floor plan and the packing on their end, and then the mover comes here. We meet the truck, we do all the unpacking on our end. And we can do the same thing for people that are leaving Atlanta and moving into new state. We just helped somebody move to Oregon. Again, we can help all across the country and even internationally.

Russ Thornton:
Wow. That's impressive that you're plugged into that network, so you can obviously partner and extend your services for people that are moving in or out of state or in or out of the Atlanta metro area. Kaye, generally speaking, how do the economics work? Let's say someone is referred to you and they say, "Kaye, you've come highly recommended. I need your help or we need your help." Do you basically schedule a meeting, a consultation, and give them a quote, or a pricing schedule? Or how does that typically work?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Everything we do is on an hourly basis. I always do a complimentary in-home consultation to really discuss what the client needs, get an idea of the scope of work. And then I provide a written estimate based on the number of hours I think it's going to take. And I break it down, so I'll say, "Floor planning, one person, two to three hours or five to seven," depending on if they need some personal shopping as well. And then downsizing, and then packing, and move management, unpacking. It's all pretty clear for the clients to see.

Kaye Ginsberg:
And then I send that estimate, and then we have a discussion, and they'll say, "Great. I want you to do everything, which we love." Or they say, "I'm going to do this and this and my family is going to help me with that, but I want you to do all the basic packing and a little unpacking." And that's fine too. We customize every job to the client. There's no set package that you have to buy into.

Russ Thornton:
Got it, got it. That's helpful because I'm sure people listening to this, that's probably one of the questions they're going to have, so thanks for sharing that. Kaye, as you know, this conversation and this podcast is ultimately all about retirement planning for women, and I think it's great that you're a women-owned business and most of your staff are women. And as we both know, women typically outlive their male partners or spouses. And so, just in our conversation, there's this recurring idea of women.

Russ Thornton:
And so, I'd love to tie our conversation and the work you're doing back to this idea of retirement. I'd like to start by asking, when you personally think of the word retirement, what comes to mind for you?

Kaye Ginsberg:
My husband and I have this conversation a lot. He has his own company. He's a marketing consultant and I run a business myself as well, and neither of us picture us retiring and just playing golf and tennis all day, which of course we both love doing that. But for us, retirement is still doing what we love, but not as much of it. Still being involved in our businesses in some way, I'd like to be still involved, maybe doing some sales, but not running everyday business. And having the opportunity to travel, and not work as hard as every day and just having a little bit more free time.

Kaye Ginsberg:
That's to us ideally the idea of retirement. Not sure if we want to stay in Atlanta, but we would love the idea of maybe being in a college town, because there's always courses and things to do, and just staying active and engaged. From my perspective in the business, the people I see that are still doing well into their 90s are people like that that just either were continuing to work in some fashion, or stay involved, or volunteer, or whatever it is, just be able to keep active and engaged. And that's my vision of how I'd like to retire.

Russ Thornton:
That sounds like a pretty great vision from where I see it, so thanks for sharing that. More specific to women in retirement, I'm curious to hear what you see as the biggest challenge that women face when they're thinking about or planning for their own retirement. And they could be married, they could be on their own, but I just always like to ask my guests this question. So curious to hear what you think is the biggest challenge women face when it comes to retirement planning.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Working with our client base, we have a lot of clients, that generation the women weren't involved in the decision-making of the financial aspect at all, and weren't, and all of a sudden are faced with, like you said earlier, they're living longer than their spouse, and they don't have the knowledge and the skillset to make all these financial decisions. Hopefully, they have adult children or people like you have their back to make sure they're making good decisions.

Kaye Ginsberg:
I think that's changing. I think more of my friends are definitely more involved. I think it's important to make sure you have all your plans in place. Planning ahead for everything is so important. No one really wants to think about not being here anymore. It's not the most fun topic, but it's the reality and it's important that you have your financial ducks in a row, have your power of attorney, have your trusts, or wills, or all those things set up. And even plan ahead a little bit in terms of what you're thinking your future living might be in terms of even senior living.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Just get educated and understand that there's a difference between an independent living, or assisted living, or skilled nursing. It's nothing worse than, and you know this too, than making decisions in a crisis. Then you're not able to have all your options, you're not thinking clearly. So I just think planning ahead is really important and understanding what you have and what you need, and where you're going.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Look, we've all lived through this pandemic the past, I don't know, year-and-a-half, whatever it's been, and we can all see that life can change in an instant. We don't know what's going to happen tomorrow, so at least having some things prepared for whatever things might come your way, I think is really important.

Russ Thornton:
Well, I couldn't agree more. I think whether we're talking about retirement or just life in general, I think there's certainly value to thinking ahead. And like you said, hopefully, being in a position to make some decisions in calm times, so you don't have compromised decision-making or thinking skills because you might be in the midst of a stressful situation or an emergency or whatever the case may be.

Russ Thornton:
Kaye, I'm really interested to hear your thoughts on this because I know ultimately a lot of your in clients, especially women are going to be over 80s, 90s, and you've given a couple of examples fo women in those age ranges. But I'm interested to hear how you think that your work through Peace of Mind Transitions impacts women and their families as they plan for or make the transition into retirement.

Russ Thornton:
That might be the adult children of your clients or maybe some of the younger folks you've had an opportunity to work with. But I'd be curious to just hear what kind of impact you see you and your company making on women's retirement.

Kaye Ginsberg:
I will definitely say that whenever we work with adult children, what they say at the end of the move is, "I'm going to go home and start cleaning out my garage, because I'm not putting my kids through this." So I feel like maybe we're making a little headway into everybody, thinking ahead about all the stuff they have and what to do with it. And I know even my husband and I now when we travel, if we don't eat it or we don't wear it, we don't bring it home.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Definitely become less minimalist, how much do you really need in terms of stuff? And the people on our team all feel that way as well. I think our little universe keeps expanding and just having people start thinking about how much stuff do I really need? And what's my plan for it? And I don't necessarily want to burden my kids with it, because it can be a lot for families.

Russ Thornton:
It's interesting that that's where you went with that question, because almost universally, I hear time and time again, something that's really important to the women and the families that I work with is, they don't want to be a burden on their children. You might be able to speak to this better than I can, but I suspect they don't think of that in terms of all the stuff they've accumulated. I think they think more in terms of financial or physical support.

Russ Thornton:
I don't think they think about all the stuff they've got sitting in their garage, or their dining room, or their storage unit, potentially being burdensome to their kids. So I think that's an interesting perspective on thinking about retirement and beyond for a lot of these women.

Kaye Ginsberg:
I think when you're an adult child, this is just exactly what happened to me, and you go through it with your parent, and you have your own kids, you're just like, "I am not going to make my kids do this." Because it was hard. Like I said, my dad had been in the Air Force. They still had barrels that the Air Force would pack into, move you into Europe, cross country, and it was just full of stuff. My brother and I went through everything and we had big dumpsters at the house.

Kaye Ginsberg:
He has six kids, I have three. We shipped stuff to family all over the country. It was a lot of work and it was exhausting. And it makes you a little mad too that you have to go through this. That's why I'm saying, our primary clients are the ones downsizing, and moving might not be feeling that, but their kids are definitely going to think differently about how they plan the disbursement of their estate, I think.

Russ Thornton:
As you've already shared, I think that's a good thing. Kaye, this has been great. I'll always enjoy speaking with you. As we start to wrap up our conversation today, a couple other questions. I know you have mentioned a couple of times that you grew up with your dad in the Air Force, you moved on average every four years, including some time in Germany. What's your favorite place you lived in, growing up, looking back today?

Kaye Ginsberg:
That's an interesting question. I think I enjoyed living in Germany because we didn't live on base, we lived in a little town. But the thing I loved most about that was that my parents were great about every holiday or vacation we had. We would travel somewhere. It was so easy to go different places in Europe, so I felt like I got to see a lot of things at an early age, and my husband and I have since traveled back. It's been fun to revisit places as an adult.

Kaye Ginsberg:
But then I also did a fair amount of growing up from middle school to high school in the Washington D.C. metro area, and I just really still have a fondness for that area. And a daughter who lives there in Arlington, Virginia now, I do get to go back but I really liked the D.C. metro area a lot too.

Russ Thornton:
Like most people, I guess, I didn't move around a lot growing up and I'm always interested to talk to people that did, whether they were in a military family or not just to... I find that, as you said, I think at the time they probably did not appreciate it or enjoy it. But looking back almost across the board, all of them remember it fondly when they think back now, so I was just curious about that.

Russ Thornton:
You're running a company, your husband is running a company. You guys are busy. You've got three kids. I'm guessing you don't have a ton of time to just sit around and do nothing, but if and when you do have an hour or two all to yourself, how do you most enjoy spending your personal time?

Kaye Ginsberg:
Well, I do love to play tennis. I used to play a lot. Now I'm lucky to get out maybe once a week, so that's a very happy place for me. My husband and I... Our kids are all in their late 20s, early 30s, they're all out of the house, so we do like to travel, go see our kids, travel... Hopefully we'll get to go internationally again soon. Planning to go next year if the world settles down a little bit. And we like cooking, and going out, and being with friends.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Those are the things that are in my happy place. I do like to read, although, like you said, I don't have much time for reading anymore. I usually fall asleep at about the first paragraphs. That would be sometime, something when I get to that retirement phase, I do have a couple hours a day maybe to play some tennis, and do some reading, and some traveling.

Russ Thornton:
Again, thanks for sharing that, and thanks for joining us to share a little bit about you, and your company, and the wonderful work you're doing for seniors and their families. And just making, what could, I think, otherwise be a pretty stressful or anxiety-inducing process of move, just making it easier, and based on one of the stories you shared, actually making it enjoyable, bringing some elements of fun to it. I think that's fantastic.

Russ Thornton:
If there were one thing that our listeners could take away from our conversation today, Kaye, what would you want that one thing to be?

Kaye Ginsberg:
I guess I would say, go back to the whole planning ahead theme, just knowing that things can change in your life and just having a plan for that. And also just knowing that there are all these resources out there as you age, and if you call me, or you, or Nancy Kaufman or other people you've interviewed that work in this space as well, we'll all be able to connect you to somebody else. So don't be afraid to reach out and ask questions, and if there's an area you think you need some help in, there are definitely people to help you.

Russ Thornton:
I couldn't agree more, there are a lot of great people doing great things, but you've got to reach out and identify what you need and who's the best person that can help you with whatever you're facing. Whether that's a move or retirement planning or exploring and selecting the best living situation for your circumstances. I think that's a great place to to wrap up our conversation today.

Russ Thornton:
We'll be sure to include in the show notes a link to your website and your LinkedIn profile and things like that. But what's the best way for people to learn more about Peace of Mind Transitions, or maybe to reach out if they'd like to talk to you about any of this information?

Kaye Ginsberg:
The website is a really great place to start. I get a lot of feedback from people that it really explains what we do, have some pictures of our team, so you'll see who's doing the jobs, and our phone number is on there or email. You can email through the website, call us. We're always happy to talk to you and help you in any way we can.

Russ Thornton:
Again, we'll include all of Kaye's links and website and things like that in the show notes. But for anyone listening, the website is peaceofmindtransitions.com. Did I get that right, Kaye?

Kaye Ginsberg:
That's exactly right. peaceofmindtransitions, with an s, .com. And the phone number is (404) 862-4271.

Russ Thornton:
Awesome. Kaye, thanks again. This has been great. I feel like we could probably easily talk for another hour. Like I mentioned earlier, we'll have to have you back to continue the dialogue at some point, but really appreciate you joining us.

Kaye Ginsberg:
Well, thank you. I appreciate being here today and all you do for women as well.

Russ Thornton:
Thanks. And everyone listening, thanks again for joining us. This is another episode of Women's Retirement Radio, and we look forward to catching up with you again next time.