Women's Retirement Radio

Laura Jalbert - At Home Therapy and Support for Seniors - Episode 49

January 17, 2022 Russ Thornton Season 3 Episode 3
Women's Retirement Radio
Laura Jalbert - At Home Therapy and Support for Seniors - Episode 49
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode of Women's Retirement Radio, I'm joined by Laura Jalbert.

Laura is the owner of Mindful Transitions, an organization providing licensed clinical social work to seniors in the Atlanta area.

Laura and her team provide mental and emotional support for seniors who are dealing with changes related to aging, medical challenges, or living with a disability. And they provide these services at the senior's location.

Laura also recently joined me for a couple of episodes in my "caregiver series."

For more on Laura, please check out these resources:

Get in touch and let me know what you think or if you have any questions.

And thank you for listening.

Visit my website to learn more.

Disclosures

Russ Thornton:
Hey, everyone. It's Russ. And welcome to another episode of Women's Retirement Radio. Today I'm really excited to be joined by a friend of many years, Laura Jalbert, who is the owner of Mindful Transitions. So welcome, Laura.

Laura Jalbert:
Thanks for having me, Russ. It's good to see you.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Great to see you too. Always enjoy speaking with you and glad we could share today's conversation with our listeners. Why don't you start, Laura, by just introducing yourself, telling people a little bit about who you are and what it is you do at Mindful Transitions?

Laura Jalbert:
Sure. I'm Laura Jalbert. I'm a licensed clinical social worker. I have been in private practice for... Well, I've been in practice for 21-and-a-half years going on 22 years, which makes me feel much older than I sometimes think about. But Mindful Transitions, I'm the owner of Mindful Transitions, and the clinical director is one of the hats I wear. And we are a team of clinical social workers who provide psychotherapy on site to older adults in their home environment. So that could be assisted living, independent living, or in-private home settings. And we accept Medicare to pay for our services as well as clients who want to direct pay, whose insurance may not cover us.

Laura Jalbert:
So we're a team now of 16, 17 clinical social workers. I didn't count before I came on, but our team has grown a lot over the years because of, as you know, the need is huge for mental health support service, and especially those specifically train towards the issues of older adults, which our entire team is. And that's unique, as well as the part where we're mobile to our clients. That's additionally unique. Although I have to say we're not quite as mobile during the pandemic.

Russ Thornton:
Well, yeah. Who is? It's been an adjustment for everyone, right?

Laura Jalbert:
Absolutely.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. So thanks for kind of sharing that background and giving people an idea of who you are and what it is you do and the work that you and your team provide. To maybe give our listeners a little bit more of kind of a practical ground, I'm not sure many folks understand what is psychotherapy and how specifically would that apply to, let's say, a senior, whether they're in an assisted living facility or still living in their home. So could you maybe give us at least paint with a broad brush, an example, or two of the kind of hands-on work that you and your team members are actually delivering?

Laura Jalbert:
Sure. So let me first say that psychotherapy is considered a medical procedure that is paid for by health insurance generally. And the reason that that is paid for by health insurance is because usually there's an accompanying diagnosis of some sort made by the provider at hand who's doing the treatment, the psychotherapy treatment, and that's what makes that service covered by healthcare. Now that said, our clients in general have a variety of issues. So they may have issues related to grief and loss, may that be a spouse, a move, a home, the dog died. Believe it or not, many of our older adult clients are grieving the loss of their adult children for various diseases and issues.

Laura Jalbert:
Sometimes the issues are related to health changes in themselves, grieving what their body used to do. And then some of our clients have lifelong, persistent mental illness that they've had since they were 18 or 20 years old, and now they're aging, and now they're 80. And so they again, need a provider who understands mental illness. So our services do take place in the home, which helps us see a little bit more about what's going on with the client than what someone would actually say in an office setting. But yeah. So our services cover a variety of different issues. We see a lot of folks with depression, anxiety. Like I said before, we see a ton of grief and loss, but then sometimes there's just interpersonal conflict with the lady down the hall isn't nice and it's causing me to stress. So it's a variety of issues, for sure.

Russ Thornton:
And I know we were kind of joking a little bit about COVID earlier, how that's kind of impacted our ability to be mobile and see people in their settings, that sort of thing, but I would imagine that the work that you do, you and your team has probably increased as a result of COVID due to more isolation, maybe lack of social interaction, things like that. Has that been the case?

Laura Jalbert:
So it has, and it hasn't because one of the challenges is that not everyone is able to access this technology. So Medicare removed some of the telehealth barriers at some point here in 2020, maybe March or April. They removed some of the barriers that we previously had in place to utilize telehealth. But what that still didn't do was teach older adults how to utilize some of this technology, and it didn't necessarily cause older adults to feel more comfortable with some of this technology. So while you might prefer an in-person visit, pandemic has forced us to do a visit by phone or a visit like this by computer. Not everyone has been comfortable with that and not everyone has access to that technology.

Laura Jalbert:
So we've had plenty of clients who said, "If I can't see the way I always do, I just don't want to." And then we've had other clients where they absolutely, they have an iPad, they know how to use it, and they're dangerous with it. So it kind of follows the whole spectrum, but I would've thought that everybody would've taken advantage of the telehealth and that just has not been the case. We have a waiting list of people who want to be seen in person at this point who have not been willing to do telehealth-

Russ Thornton:
Interesting.

Laura Jalbert:
... which I think is interesting. Yeah.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah, that's fascinating. I guess the joke that everybody now knows how to use Zoom, it does not necessarily extend to all the seniors out there quite yet.

Laura Jalbert:
It does not. And sometimes when you think about the process of establishing trust and the process of meeting someone new, what are the things that seniors are taught over and over to avoid scams and fraud and everything else? It's don't talk to somebody you don't know well on the phone and give them all kinds of personal information. And here we are saying to seniors, like, we've got to do all this by phone. Well, this is not their comfort zone. They've been conditioned and for many good reasons to not, but here we are. It's a pandemic and we need to provide services however we can. So it's got a lot more complicated nuances, I think, maybe than other areas of the medical world.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. I guess I hadn't really made that connection between all of the seniors that are isolated and getting them the care of the attention they need, whether it's mental health assistance or physical health. I guess it just introduces a whole new set of challenges and obstacles that need to be addressed and overcome.

Laura Jalbert:
Absolutely. Yeah.

Russ Thornton:
So I'm actually just curious, Laura, so who hires you? Is it an aging person's adult children? Is it a care facility where they're maybe staying? Is it the senior themselves? Or is it kind of a variety depending on the circumstances?

Laura Jalbert:
So for the bulk of our work, the older adult is the one who hires us technically. They have to authorize who can utilize their health insurance benefits. So they have to elect their healthcare provider, which could be one of the members of our team. So they sign all of the consent documents, they sign all of the financial documents that Medicare makes us have on file for them. They, as individuals, are in charge of that medical care. Now, there are some services that we provide. Like there are some consultations that we offer families where let's say mom or dad doesn't want to have any part of the idea of psychotherapy, but the adult children are in need of support and advice around mom's dementia or around mom's long history of schizophrenia, and now that she's 80, they really don't know what to do. In those instances, I'm able to see those families. And so the family themselves would be the client as opposed to the individual.

Russ Thornton:
Got it. Interesting.

Laura Jalbert:
The facilities don't hire us. They may sometimes refer. They may sometimes say, "We have a resident here who's been crying every day since she moved in, can you please see her?" And then we have the same conversation, which is, does she want to be seen? Does she want to be involved? Does she agree to this? Because ultimately, psychotherapy is a process where you have to participate with the provider. It's not like other forms of medical care where we can sort of, I don't know, if you sit still long enough, we can give you an IV of something that fixes you. That is not how psychotherapy works unfortunately.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. And I know you mentioned earlier when you were kind of introducing yourself and talking about Mindful Transitions, could you give our listeners just a little bit of an idea of kind of your background and the background of your team members? The skillset and the experience they bring to the table to deliver this level of care, an engagement with these seniors. Some of which I can only imagine are some really challenging and difficult situations and circumstances that they're probably walking into.

Laura Jalbert:
Sure. Yeah, we don't get many cases that are easy, not anymore. So my background, I started out in an assisted living, running an assisted living memory care unit when I first came out of graduate school, and then had inpatient psychiatric experience on the older adult units of a local psychiatric hospital, and then also a med psych hospital before I went into private practice in working under a psychiatrist. And the rest of my team is comprised of all licensed clinical social workers, various backgrounds, but many have come from the world of hospice. So they provided care at end of life, grief and loss work for families, and also the hospice client who may have been passing. I have a social worker on our team who has inpatient neurology experience.

Russ Thornton:
Wow.

Laura Jalbert:
Yeah. We have quite a variety of skillsets. Several folks who have inpatient psychiatry as well. So I say we try to make the best fit based on the situation at hand because our team has such extensive experience.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah, I always find it interesting to get a better understanding of kind of the people involved. And it sounds like you built a heck of a team with a really deep bench of talent. So congrats, because I know as you and I have kept in touch over the years, you've just seen tremendous growth in your business, and I know how hard it can be to find really good people to do the important work that you guys are delivering.

Laura Jalbert:
It is hard, but they're rock stars. They've got this. They're great. They're great.

Russ Thornton:
That's awesome. So from your perspective, Laura, or maybe the perspective of your team members that are actually out delivering the one-on-one care with seniors, what would you say is the biggest challenge that you guys help people address through your work or help people solve?

Laura Jalbert:
I think it would probably be recognizing that a lot of the solutions are self-directed. I think one of the key features of psychotherapy these days is recognizing how much your behavior impacts your mood and your life overall. And I think that especially with older adults, even if they've had psychotherapy in the past, maybe the direction of their behavior was not necessarily the central focus, because psychotherapy has changed a lot over the years. It used to be, let's talk about your mother, let's talk about the past, let's talk about your childhood. And while those pieces are still important and they're still involved in our work, if we've got somebody who's 80 years old and they're isolating in their room at the assisted living, the first thing we need to do is get them out of that room, not necessarily to talk about their mom.

Laura Jalbert:
And so I think the greatest intervention we bring is just that attention to your own behavior and your own ability to control, to some degree, what's going on with you, because I think also one thing that our society tells older adults is maybe that you're out to pass here and it's not about you anymore. And I think sometimes even moving into a community where control is lost on a great number of things, like what time you eat, what time you sleep, all of those activities change for you. And so I think it's sort of reestablishing some floating and maybe even some control over, huh, I do have some part in how I feel and how I can make myself feel better. And that may sound overly simplistic, but I think that's often where we start is just helping somebody see that they still got to vote in this and this can change.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Hearing you describe that, the words that come to mind for me are like agency and autonomy, like showing people that you do still have some... You can self direct, like, like you said, your behavior, some of your day to day routines, even if it's within the structure of say an assisted living facility or something like that, which I think is really interesting. Let me kind of ask you a twist on that same question, Laura.

Laura Jalbert:
Okay.

Russ Thornton:
What is the biggest challenge for, let's say, your team members in actually delivering the work, actually trying to help these seniors, especially when they're dealing with mental health issues?

Laura Jalbert:
You will probably not find this a surprise, but I think financially is the greatest barrier that we see for clients, the finances. If their insurance doesn't fully cover the care, or if there's an out-of-pocket copay that their insurance leaves, sometimes that is the largest barrier. Usually the team can get in and do the interpersonal work and establish rapport. And believe it or not, we've done therapy with lots and lots of folks whose family members told us there was no way, like, "My dad's never going to talk to you." Okay, give us three times. But larger barrier than that is just clients at the front door isolating themselves further by not having the funds, not being able to spend funds, not having adequate insurance coverage. And I'm sure you see that with your retirement planning questions.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. So on that theme, do you encounter people that want or need, or both your help, but they reach a point where they can no longer afford it or they just don't have the financial means to sustain the ongoing care?

Laura Jalbert:
I mean, I think the greater challenge is clients who have selected another type of insurance aside from traditional Medicare. Those carriers and those coverages, despite what people are sold are not as robust, and there are not as many providers who are able to take those other coverages, and nowhere more profoundly than in psychiatry. If you were looking for a psychiatrist who takes health insurance of any kind Medicare or otherwise, the list is very short in the Metro Atlanta area. And so I think, do you want to see a psychiatrist who sees you for 15 minutes or do you want to talk with someone for an hour? And there's a distinct difference certainly in the payer source of which is possible here in Atlanta.

Russ Thornton:
Well, and I don't want to get too far off on the tangent of insurance because that's another conversation in of itself, but when you're talking about like traditional Medicare versus, are you about like Medicare Advantage Plans or like Medi-Share Plans or is it just really going to vary from provider to provider and policy to policy?

Laura Jalbert:
I'm talking about the Advantage Plans in particular because they are probably the same healthcare coverage that you and I have where there's a list of providers who we can see via our coverage. And that's how the Advantage Plans work. And the challenge with that is that there aren't as many providers willing to accept those Advantage Plans because of how providers are treated on the other side of that. And so what we end up with then is clients saying, "Well, nobody takes my insurance or somebody who takes my insurance doesn't specialize like you do, doesn't know older adult mental health. So I'd rather private pay with you and figure out how to get reimbursed if I can than not see anyone at all, or to see someone who's not skilled-

Russ Thornton:
Interesting.

Laura Jalbert:
... in the area that I need." But then that can potentially become a barrier like we were talking about longer term because if you're having to pay out of pocket for everything and let's say your insurance doesn't do any better job of paying you than it did the provider, at some point, you've been out of pocket for all those funds.

Russ Thornton:
Right.

Laura Jalbert:
And so that can become a barrier.

Russ Thornton:
Interesting. And does long term care insurance ever play a role? Does that ever come into play to help fund the kind of care you guys provide? Or is that really more... I hate to use words like a traditional long term care need, because I don't want to characterize what you get guys do is unimportant or not potentially a long term care need or situation, but does long term care insurance ever come into play as a potential funding source for your services?

Laura Jalbert:
It may but not directly. So we do not bill anything out towards long-term care insurance, but that said, for clients who may have a robust policy that it says, "We pay anything for your providers that your insurances didn't cover," and if the client submits it to their long term care insurance, they very well could receive the rest of reimbursement for whatever insurance didn't pay. I haven't seen many policies that were that robust, not anymore, but it's possible that there are still some out there. But for the most part, we're covered under just traditional health insurance or not.

Russ Thornton:
Got it. Got it. Recognizing clearly that every client that you guys work with is unique and has a different set of circumstances challenges, is there sort of a, for lack of a better description, like a perfect client or a perfect situation where you guys have found that you can add the most value or do the most good work?

Laura Jalbert:
I like to tell families that the best time to get us involved with their loved one is before they make the move. Oftentimes, they're trying to approach mom or dad about a move into a community or adding more help in the home, and utilizing us at the very beginning of that process is sometimes the most helpful, because if there's a move, if there are new things for the older adult to adjust to, we've already then developed rapport and a relationship and we can sort of help with those adjustments along the way. So I think that would be the ideal time to use us. we've had families try to bring us in like the second they want to tell mom or dad that they're moving, and that goes just about as well as you might imagine.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah.

Laura Jalbert:
So it all works better. If we can start early and develop relationship with the client before the adjustments and changes start to come down the pike, because then we've sort of established enough of a relationship to navigate those together alongside the client and help them feel more supported. Especially if the situation is not something where the client is thrilled about making a move or thrilled about selling the house, and there's going to be some strain and stress with the adult child, it's perfect to have that non-interested party, let's say, to navigate that with the older adult.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. So it sounds like it's most often centered around the transition out of their home into a care facility of some sort or another, but to your comment or to your point, the earlier, the better that they could get you guys involved to start setting the foundation for those important conversations and helping kind of guide those important changes in an older adult's life.

Laura Jalbert:
Absolutely. And sometimes the kind of the low, like if you're seeing a change in functioning or if you're seeing the older adult not function as well in their own home, I mean, sometimes treating their depression is what helps them be able to stay there. Now that they're bathing again and they're eating again and they're back to the usual daily life at activities, maybe they don't need to go anywhere. But maybe they had really severe depression, and again, the isolation of the pandemic is helping no one with that, but if we can treat the depression, we may be able to stave off the move.

Laura Jalbert:
And so again, starting early, starting before a crisis, starting before, "Oh my God, mom has to move," I mean, we may be able to prevent that and we may be able, through psychotherapy, to motivate mom or dad to say, "If it's really important for you to stay in your own home, let's step up this game. Let's step up your activities. Let's step up your success at these activities. This is the reason why everybody is talking about you getting out of your house. So let's, let's do these things if you don't want to go." And that may or may not be realistic, we have to evaluate in each situation, but I've seen that happen too. The family brought us in and ultimately a move wasn't needed.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah. I think that's a hugely important point about the opportunity for prevention or deferral. So hearing you kind of give that example, to my mind, like if you can restore one or more of the activities of daily living, that might also mean not only can they stay in their home longer, but that also defers the need to trigger the long term care insurance, if that's in place, things like that. So I think there's a cascading of positive effects that something like that could have in a client's situation. So I'm really glad you shared that.

Laura Jalbert:
Yeah.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Speaking of clients, and I think you kind of started to allude to one there, Laura, can you give us like a favorite client success story, someone that comes to mind that you guys have worked with and been able to really do some really happy with the outcomes?

Laura Jalbert:
Gosh, I think probably... We just had our holiday party and we talked about a number of these. From the past year, everybody was sharing their success stories. I mean, I think that just any client where we're able to keep them where they want to be has been a success story over this past year. Any client who has not lost any functioning while they haven't been able to see their doctors so they haven't been able to engage in their usual activities has really been a success story. I'm trying to think. I'm not sure I can give you a specific favorite, but there have been a lot of really cool successes.

Russ Thornton:
That's awesome. Well, I know you guys do great work and I know your clients get a ton out of the guidance and the mental health support that you provide. So that's just another reason I'm really happy to be having this conversation with you. Laura, before we kind of transition into kind of talking more about retirement and your views on retirement, especially as it relates to women, what haven't I asked you that you'd like to address as far as you, Mindful Transitions, your team, and the work that you guys do?

Laura Jalbert:
I mean, I think there are other avenues that clinical social work can help older adults. And I think it's important to highlight those because I don't know which end of the spectrum some of your listeners might be on, they may be dealing with some emergency situations or they may be dealing with they're not sure where the legal competency line is for mom or dad with the issues surrounding power of attorney or agreeing to medical care. And sometimes clinical social workers can be used to support sorting out those issues as well. So I think that's important. Also, while we like to avoid every emergency that we can, there are sometimes older adult psychiatric emergencies and we do participate in those as needed as well. So I think it's important to highlight, but that's not necessarily the bulk of what we do, but I think it is key that if you need those services, that is part of what what we can offer.

Russ Thornton:
Well, I'm glad you mentioned that. And before we wrap up our conversation today, we'll be sure to share your contact information and how people can reach out and get in touch if they'd like to talk to you or one of your team members and just learn more or see if they might need to explore working with you guys further. So I'm glad you mentioned that because while we've been talking primarily around mental health and psychotherapy, you guys, you and your team, clearly bring a much broader skillset to the table. It can help in a variety of situations. So I think that's super important, and I'm glad you highlighted that.

Russ Thornton:
So this is Women's Retirement Radio and our focus at the end of the day is around retirement planning for women. And so whether you're listening to this and you're in your 50s and 60s and are thinking about maybe an aging parent and some of this conversation might be relevant to you from that perspective, or maybe you're a little older yourself and you're thinking about, or maybe dealing with, or facing some of these decisions about staying in your home versus moving along. Clearly there's an element that ties all of this back to retirement. So Laura, I would just be curious when you personally think of the word retirement, what comes to mind for you?

Laura Jalbert:
I have to wonder how soon, how soon is it coming? And then the second thought after that is usually it's going to be a while. But no, in my mind, retirement is this ideal world where I don't have to work and I get to play and it feels kind of far away still.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. But I would push back a little bit because well, you're a business owner and I know some days are much better than others, but I also get the sense that you really, really enjoy your work.

Laura Jalbert:
Oh yes.

Russ Thornton:
I don't know. Maybe we wouldn't classify it as play, but it really feels like, because I've seen you just light up when you're talking about your clients and helping them and working with your teammates and things like that. So I'm curious if you're actually getting an element of that play or that kind of fulfillment in that aspect of your life from your work.

Laura Jalbert:
I think sometimes I do. I think sometimes I do, but to your point, not every day, right? Because every day, they're just the task list and those kind of things. But when I'm working with families or solving a really complicated problem across a lot of systems, yeah, I get really excited about that. So it's not the same as what I anticipate retirement will be, but yeah, it is still joyous work.

Russ Thornton:
And thinking about retirement, do you... And maybe you don't know the answer to this, but do you think more along the lines of at some point in time, maybe it's a certain birthday or maybe there's some catalyst out there when you grow the team to a certain size or something like that, do you envision maybe just kind of starting to dial back, but still being involved in some degree in the business? Or can you envision a point where you just say, "It's been great, I'm done, I'm going to sell the business" and let somebody else kind of carry on the great work that you guys have been doing or do you really have a lot of clarity around that at this point?

Laura Jalbert:
I don't know. I mean, I'm pretty type A. So I could definitely see myself not letting go of totally of the reigns, but could I work a fewer hours and take my foot off the gas at some future point? I sure hope so. I sure hope so. Yeah. Because I mean, being a business owner, just that buck stops with you all the time. If you don't do it, it may not get done. And I have a great team on me, but literally, I mean, we're doing it, we're doing it every day. And so if I were to take my foot off the gas, I still worry about where stuff would fall, into whom it would fall, if not me. And so I would say I would have to put some serious pieces in place in order to feel like I really could take my foot off the gas.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. Well, thanks for sharing that. And then thinking a little bit more broadly just about retirement in general, as it relates to women, what do you see... I mean, I'm particularly interested in your perspective, Laura, given all the work and experience you have working with older adults, what do you see as the biggest challenge particular to women when it comes to planning for retirement?

Laura Jalbert:
I think it may be just sort of underestimating the many hats that they're going to have to wear. On the one hand, I speak with women who may have already retired for the most part, right? Sometimes they're younger, sometimes they're the adult children of the older adult, but for the most part, I'm speaking with the older adult and what they haven't planned for is all the hats that they're going to wear within their family or within perhaps caregiving roles, et cetera, in their retirement. So for example, they're going to need to take grandchildren places and they're going to have medical needs that they didn't think of, and their spouse is going to do things that they hadn't planned, or be ill in ways that they hadn't planned.

Laura Jalbert:
I mean, there are some women still, and I know you see them that haven't planned to be able to manage their own finances. Somebody else already did them. So there are lots of kind of areas where women just did not anticipate, I think, what was coming ahead and what those costs might look like either financially or sort of emotionally.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. I think that's an interesting perspective. I think so many people spend so much time kind of thinking about looking forward to this idea of retirement that they don't really think through like, all right, well, how am I going to spend a random Tuesday in retirement? And what am I going to have to do versus what do I want to do? So I think that's a really interesting perspective. And given your wealth experience and history working at Mindful Transitions along with your team members, how would you say, Laura, that your work impacts the lives of women that are either transitioning into retirement or that are maybe have been in retirement for many years?

Laura Jalbert:
I think our job is to support them in what they're trying to do and what they're trying to accomplish. We were talking a moment ago about the many hats that they're suddenly asked to wear that they maybe didn't anticipate, like being a caregiver, either for grandchildren or being a caregiver for a spouse or holy cow coordinating the modification of an area of their home due to someone's change in physical condition. Those are things that they maybe were not prepared for. And so our job is to support them through the stress of that. Sometimes it's being the one to shine a light on a resource, perhaps, but for the most part, I see our role as support, emotional support through these oh goodness moments that they didn't anticipate coming, but here they are and are double whammy's because they didn't prepare or they didn't anticipate that these things could happen.

Russ Thornton:
Right. Right. Yeah, I think that's a helpful perspective, especially coming from someone like you, given your experience in your insight into dealing with people as they age and deal with some of these challenges, whether physical, mental, or both. So thank you for that. As we start to wrap up, I always like to ask, Laura, you're busy, you're running a growing business, but if and when you have an hour or two to yourself, and I think your husband, John's, involved in the business too, right?

Laura Jalbert:
Yes.

Russ Thornton:
So when you or when you and John have an hour or two to yourself, how do you most enjoy spending it outside of work?

Laura Jalbert:
We've been enjoying a lot of walks during the pandemic, evening walks, but I think we like to be outside, doing things outside. That does not mean that I like yard work, it just means-

Russ Thornton:
To be clear

Laura Jalbert:
Yes. To be clear, it is not the raking, the mowing, the weeding, none of that. But no, I like to be outside. I like to be getting a lot of sun. I'm trying to think what else. I love to cook. We love to create stuff in the kitchen. And sometimes it's one of us, sometimes it's both of us that are creating things. So, yeah, we actually do a lot of stuff together. Even though we work together, we do have a few hobbies that are also similar.

Russ Thornton:
Good for you. What's a favorite dish that has come out of your kitchen recently that you've really enjoyed making and enjoying?

Laura Jalbert:
It's one of our old time favorites, so it's not recent. And in fact, I need to make it again soon because we were just talking about it the other day, like, "Oh, we miss this." It's called Chicken Chasseur. And it's like an old French Hunter's stew, but believe it or not, it's one of the few French recipes with no butter.

Russ Thornton:
Really? I didn't know there was such a thing.

Laura Jalbert:
Right? Right? No, it has mushrooms and shallots and chicken and stock and tomatoes and it just stews for a really long time. And woo, howdy. Rest. It's good. It's good.

Russ Thornton:
That sounds good. Especially now with the cooler weather we're getting, it sounds like some good comfort food.

Laura Jalbert:
It is paired with mashed potatoes.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah.

Laura Jalbert:
Not much is better than that.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. Wow. So now we're going to leave all our listeners with their mouths watering.

Laura Jalbert:
And Googling Chicken Chasseur.

Russ Thornton:
Exactly. So Laura, we've covered a ton. Always love talking to you and catching up. If there were one thing that our listeners could take away from our conversation today, what would you want that one thing to be?

Laura Jalbert:
I think it's just to recognize that you have the power to change how you feel about things. And if you're feeling overwhelmed or if you need support or you know someone who's feeling overwhelmed and need support as dire as the situation could seem at any moment, there is help out there, and it is relatively easy to access, and things can change.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah. And speaking of which that's a great segue into telling folks how they can and get in touch and learn more. So if folks are listening to this and say, "Wow, I need to really kind of brush up on all of the support services that are available out there to help myself or to help my family, whether that's a parent or a friend or whatever the case may be," what's the best way for people to learn more about you, Laura, your company, your team, and the work that you guys are doing?

Laura Jalbert:
So you can check out our website, it's mindfultransitions.com. That's one L, M-I-N-D-F-U-L transitions with an s.com. And there's a good bit of information there about the team and everyone's specialties. And then also the services that we provide and how they're paid for is all covered there on the website. You can find us on Facebook, we're on LinkedIn as well. So you can kind of look and see what's of interest to you and how we may be able to support you. Our website has our contact telephone number, but if you want to reach us directly by phone, it's 678-637-7166. And we always have a clinical social worker who handles all of our intake calls. So when you call, you're not speaking with a secretary, but you are speaking with somebody who has the same training as I, so that we're really listening and we really know what you've got going on. So yeah, feel free to give us a call or check out our website and see if we can be of help or support.

Russ Thornton:
Yeah, thanks. As I mentioned earlier, we'll share a link to Laura's website, Facebook, LinkedIn, as well as her phone number in the show notes for this episode. So if anyone is interested, feel free to reach out, and I know Laura or one of her teammates would be more than happy to chat and see if they can be a resource for you and your family. Yeah, Laura, thank you. I just want to tell you how much I appreciate you joining me and sharing with our listeners a little bit about who you are and the important work that you and your team are doing. And I really appreciate you. So thank you.

Laura Jalbert:
Oh, thank you again for having me. I'm just glad you're doing this. I think this is so important for women in particular to get some additional advice, and I trust you to be the one to give it to them. So I love that you're doing this.

Russ Thornton:
Well, thank you. I appreciate it. And for everyone out there listening, thanks for joining us. My name's Russ. This has been another episode of Women's Retirement Radio, and we look forward to catching up with you on the next episode. Thanks again, Laura.

Laura Jalbert:
Thank you.