More than just mindfulness

The Essentials of Mindfulness-based Resilience

August 27, 2018 Season 1 Episode 1
More than just mindfulness
The Essentials of Mindfulness-based Resilience
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
The Essentials of Mindfulness-based Resilience
Aug 27, 2018 Season 1 Episode 1
Robert Mitchell
The essential practices of mindfulness-based resilience
Show Notes Transcript

Mindfulness-Based Resilience is the name I give to the set of practices that I teach which are designed to build resilience through a combination of mindfulness, emotional resilience and stress management training.
This is from the final session of a short course that I Delivered for a key third sector organisation. The practices are the following: - The Meditation of no Meditation - A Pranayama - The Four Tens Meditation - The Relaxation response

Speaker 1:
0:01
Hi everyone and welcome to the first of my podcasts in a more than just mindfulness podcast series. This particular session is something I called it just recently. It was part of the last session. In a short course, it focuses on the essential techniques, so these are the takeaways. There's I frictionless meditation. There isn't actually a meditation. You have to listen to it to understand I breathing technique that helps to work on anxiety and stress or relaxation technique and all of these add up to a set of practices you can use during your day to help to bring you back into balance from the places that are busy life and stressful life takes us. This is the essentials of mindfulness based resilience. What we're going to do now is I want to teach you the essentials. I've explained to you how you can get them into your life. Get a pebble, puts it at the place where you think you'll be able to do the essential practices and then that pebbles there to remind you one day you'll discover that you ignored the pebble and what you do is you either move it to a slightly different place or you replace it with another pebble and don't worry there's an infinite number of pebbles.:
Speaker 1:
1:35
If you put the pebble in the place that's best for you, that's good. You can have many pebbles. For instance, if you can only meditate while you're doing the dishes, you'll have one on the kitchen, window sill or on the, if you think you can also meditate when your having a bath and I put it on the end of the bath. For a lot of people having a bath, the only time they actually physically get to relax and you. Part of my purpose is to help you to be able to relax wherever you are.:
Speaker 1:
2:08
What we'll do is we'll start off with a meditation of no meditation for sound. And so to do this you can sit however you like because it's not a meditation. And this is the sort of thing you can do as you're walking along the road is to notice all sounds by notice all sounds. What I mean is this, whenever we acquired, so your choir, I'm not, I'm chattering a why, but I'm part of the sounds. So at the beginning of this you were just listening to my voice and now you're aware there are other sounds. So there's somebody closing a car outside the sound of the rain. There's moments in the room. And the way to look at it is like when we listen to one sound where listening to one instrument, when we're listening to all sound, what? Listening to the entire orchestra.:
Speaker 2:
3:07
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
3:08
And what that does is helps to bring us here, here, right now physically back to this place. This is what we call presence or mindfulness. The awareness that we're here and we've become aware of sound. So sound is waves. And those waves are washing over you from a variety of different places. And that's all it consists of. Remember, it's not meditation, there's no goal, no expectation, you're not getting anything out of it, but it's something you can do and it's something that you can do without getting anything out of it, which is a really important thing because we only tend to do things if we think we're going to get something from it or stop something from happening. And then what we're doing is we're finding,:
Speaker 2:
4:05
okay,:
Speaker 1:
4:06
this experience, which we can do and we can do it as we go about our day and we're doing it without an expectation of getting anything from it.:
Speaker 2:
4:22
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
4:24
So it's like sounds a big bubble. Stretches as far as the furthest sound. So when you begin this, cast your mind to the furthest sound, airplane, traffic voices, whatever it might happen to be. Roadworks, helicopter, police, siren, it doesn't matter. And that's the extent of the bubble, the sensory bubble of all sound. And then you're letting all the sound in that bubble into your awareness. Just letting it wash over you. No, it's not a concentration exercise. Meditation is so often presented as and every so often I'll sound the bell just to add to the orchestral nature of all sound.:
Speaker 2:
5:22
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
5:24
And it doesn't matter what's happening, your thoughts, your emotions, your experience, doesn't matter. It's noticing sound. I remember this isn't a meditation, this is the meditation of no meditation for sound.:
Speaker 2:
6:18
[inaudible] okay.:
Speaker 1:
8:29
Okay, so now what are we going to do is we are still at the center of this bubble sensory bubble of all sound and you're kind of noticing the hubbub of sound,:
Speaker 1:
8:42
the traffic and movements in the room. The sound of my voice and it's all just a hub like gear in a cafe. So you're in a cafe, you're reading a book and in the background there's all this sound going there. Music Nights, clink of cups, they're scraping of chairs as people chatting, hissing of the espresso machine. The traffic noise is out in the street, there's children, there's a lot of it all going on, doors opening and closing. Very noisy place at cafe. But there you are. You're sitting in the middle of it and you'll notice in the hubbub.:
Speaker 2:
9:17
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
9:18
So rather than picking out single noise, what? Trying to listen to somebody else's conversation, which we all do, which is fine, but that isn't the experience of listening to the hub. You can notice the difference when you focus on the conversation, then you come back to the hub. And that's what we want in the hubbub of all sound. Listen to the orchestra instead of the instrument so you can stay there.:
Speaker 2:
9:47
And:
Speaker 1:
9:48
while we're in this center of this century bubble of all sound, what we're doing is noticing a movement on the movement is the movement of the belly just at the point. All right, connect. So the chest top of the ballet. And if you can't feel the movement, you might need to put your fingers there for a moment and you just know it. Seeing it rising and falling. And again, so this is not a meditation. This is the meditation of no meditation for breath. And again, what happens in the mind doesn't matter. Thoughts, emotions, desires, memories, not it doesn't matter. Don't worry about it. Just notice in the price and we're noticing the breath at the center of all sound. Okay, so I know very on time noticing whatever it is you can smell and taste. Gently return your attention to the room.:
Speaker 1:
11:51
That's all. Got a couple of questions for or hands. Did anybody find that difficult? It's okay if you found it difficult because actually the people that find it the most difficult irregular meditators because what they've managed to figure that meditation, some sort of willpower based activity in their head and then they translate that onto this so it becomes difficult. Do you see a tape take the breathing out of it. The meditation of no meditation for sound is the easiest thing. The only reason I did the breathing as well is for some of you for whom you'll find that better. You've got another string to your bow. When you're walking on the road, you just allow all sound in. This is infinitely better outdoors. Who found it to be an, you know, an enjoyable or positive experience? Everyone. Okay. Yeah. That feeling multiply it by 10 the minute you walk out that door.:
Speaker 1:
13:02
Yeah, it's huge, huge difference and the reason for that is because there's 360 degree sound and we're designed to do this. This is what we do when we're walking through the forest at night. All human beings do this. You hit, you hit tiny little rustling and when you stop, you can hear it all. The movement of the wind in the trays. If there's a creature moving around, you can hear it. That's the meditation of no meditation for sound and that the forest at night is the best place to do it. Something you will notice if you find a practice that works for you, just one you'll notice that you'll notice more and you'll start doing things like looking up. You'll walk out of your house and you'll see something you've never seen before, despite the fact you're walked out your house every day for like 25 years.:
Speaker 1:
13:57
We're not. When I used to do my commute before I learned to meditate, I'd leave my house and I'd be in a street full of other pedestrians, cars, and whatever projects was going through my head. After I learned some meditate, I'd walk out, there's the sky, got the clouds, you've got the wind, you've got the Ryan, because that's what we're designed to do it. This is all about reconnecting. So that's the most essential practice is the meditation of no meditation because it's frictionless. So what we're gonna do now is what's called a Pranayama breathing technique. This is an Indian yogic, many thousands of years old practice that has been fully accept her as a wellness benefit. There is something special about breathing in through your nostrils. When you do that mind becomes quiet. It's like a pause button.:
Speaker 1:
15:04
The breath is huge. I mean, think about it. When you're, you're in labor, what do they tell you to do? Breathe. Okay. But yeah, it works. It works quite well with pine as, as a way of, I mean, that's why they teach it. It's a way of helping cope with the pine so that the patient doesn't become a resistance and cause you to not respond in the way that they want you to respond, to make the birth as safe as possible. Portland and thing is you'll not trying to fill your lungs. The only key to this is to try to make the breath as smooth as possible rather than, you know, sometimes we might breathe in a lot at the beginning of the breadth and hardly at the end of the breath or we might breathe in a little bit at the beginning of the breath and a lot's at the end of the breath.:
Speaker 1:
15:53
What we want to do is make it smooth. You can count and when you count, you count in your head. One, 1002 1003 1004 1000 when you're breathing out, six seconds, one 1002 1003 1004 1005 1006 1000 when you're out and about and you're in a stressful situation or at home in a stressful situation, you can just do the counting because that's a second. If I count one, two, three, four, that's actually two and a half seconds. So it slows down the count. It's quite accurate. You can get to within 10% accuracy. Your body's in relaxation mode. When you breathe out, it's in stress mode. When you breathe in, it's in relaxation mode. When you breathe out, your body knows that if you, you kind of out of a stressful experience. Yeah. Oh that was terrible. It was terrible. It's a long breath. And while we are doing is relaxing and you're moving your body out of stress in the relaxation, this is one of the reasons that this works.:
Speaker 1:
17:05
Breathing out for six seconds and in for four seconds you're spending 50% more time in relaxation mode than you are in stress mode. So what you're doing is bringing your body back into balance, has two effects. One is moving your body over to relaxation mode and the other is it creates a thing called coherence where your heart rate and your breath synchronizes. And what that does is that telling your brain everything's okay. They only 50% of people notice that if the whole thing's uncomfortable, don't worry about it because we're going to do a relaxation exercise afterwards and that works in a very similar way. Let's do two minutes of Pranayama. Prana means breath. A Yama means extend and we'll just do that for two minutes and some of you will notice a difference. Some of the others you won't. But what was happening is it's actually calming you down.:
Speaker 2:
18:15
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
18:39
it becomes uncomfortable just by aloud. We'll do the relaxation exercise in a minute.:
Speaker 1:
20:19
All right. This last two minutes, has anybody noticed any calmness from doing that? Hands up. Calling people? Yup. Okay, so 50% yeah, and there are enough. Not everybody notices, but it works. And you'll notice it if, let's say you're going to try and get sleep and this is one of the things he can do. So there you go. If you can't get sleep, try this for a little while. Do you can do it for about four or five minutes and see how it works. If it is, it's either going to work for it isn't, it? Doesn't work. Come back to it a later stage. All of these will work eventually. But what you, what you need is one practice to bring into your life to benefit you. And the most obvious place that that happens is actually sleep, which is why most people sleep better after they've practice some of the techniques that I teach. Okay? So the other essential is the four tens meditation. And so this is a meditation, so to, to meditate. It's good if you're sitting to adopt what I call her open, relaxed and balanced posture. And all that means is, so comfort's the primary thing here. You need to be comfortable, um, after comfort, a straight back saying 16 forward or sitting with your back against the back of the chair, whichever is most comfortable for you. If you lift your head slightly and put your elbows at your side, you'll instantly move into a more relaxed posture.:
Speaker 1:
22:01
And what do his whole teach this as? A Meditation Solo? Begin and end with the bell. I'm sorry. If you'd begin by placing the palm of your hand, almost up against your forehead. Put very, very close to it, but not actually in touch. What you'll do is you'll notice a tiny tingling and you'll also notice the warmth of your hand on your forehead. Most people well, and so if you put your hand back down, you're now connected to your forehead. You're aware there's a feed back loop. You know how it feels. So if you place your tongue against the sharp part of your teeth and you were aware of your breath and noticing the breath, what we're going to do is relax the forehead, the eyebrows, the eyes, and the cheeks on the out breath. So it's breathing in normally. Breathing out, relaxing the forehead, eyebrows. Oh is unchanged. So we're hijacking the relaxation part of the breath. Breathing in normally breathing out, relaxing the allies on the area or around the tongue against the sharp part of the teeth helps to relax the face.:
Speaker 2:
23:42
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
23:53
you only need to do that for about five or 10 out breaths and then move on to the mouth and the lips, jaw and throat, tungsten in contact with the sharp part of the teeth. Breathing in. Normally when you breathe out, relax in the mouth and the lips, jaw and throat.:
Speaker 1:
24:45
Again, five or 10 out breaths you choose. When you're doing this at home, you decide I'll do it for five outbreath I did for seven outbreath. I do it for 10 hours, but that's whatever. Atms, debate and now the back and sides of the neck and shoulders. And with your elbows at the side, if your chin tilted up a little bit so that your scale is balanced as comfortably as possible on top of the spine tongue still in contact with the sharp part of the Tafe. And on the out breath you're relaxing the back and sides of the neck and the shoulders.:
Speaker 2:
25:25
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
25:26
And noticing the weight of the arms, pulling the shoulders down and just relax and allow that to happen.:
Speaker 2:
25:38
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
25:39
Cause that's how you know you're truly relaxed.:
Speaker 2:
25:46
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
25:47
Again, five or 10 out breaths, back and sides of the neck and shoulders.:
Speaker 2:
25:59
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
26:01
The final exercise is relaxing the hands. So if you haven't learned how to do that, breathing in, clench your fists, not achingly hard, but tight enough. So there's tension there. And then when you breathe out, you let go of your hand and the tension. Now breathe in tight and the first breathe out. Relax that hand. Just let it open up like a lotus:
Speaker 2:
26:31
flower.:
Speaker 1:
26:34
And just do that for three or four breaths. And what you're doing is you're training yourself to be aware of the sensation associated with relaxing your hands. And then you're relaxing your hands, breathing in and normally breathing out, relaxing your hands for about five or 10 out breath. Keep the tongue gently in contact with the sharp part of the teeth. Well now what we want to do is relax all of that part of the body. So when we brought you, then,:
Speaker 2:
27:26
yeah,:
Speaker 1:
27:27
notice the coolness in the nostrils when you breathe out. Forehead on his shoulders, hands relaxing. Breathe in, cool, miss of the nostrils. Breathing out.:
Speaker 2:
27:47
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
27:48
Top of the head. Moving like a wave of relaxation down your body, down to the tips of your fingers, down through your feet and into the ground. And then the next in breath coolness of the nostril, Tommy and contact with the sharp part of the teeth. Why? Eve of relaxation moving down the body from the top of your head to the tips of your fingers down through your feet into the ground. Okay. And the last part of this when we're doing the entire body, and that's why I called the relaxation response. So if you just want to notice again what you can smell and taste the feeling of your feet and:
Speaker 2:
28:52
right with the ground being, feeling of being pushed into the chair, gently return your attention to the room. Okay? Okay.:
Speaker 1:
29:11
Try a little experiment. Put your tongue between your teeth. Now try its and your jaw muscles do you spend? That's right. You can't get calm. So what is it? So physiological switch. When your tongue is in contact with your teeth, your body turns off the muscles in the jaw. And because you are relaxing your jaw, you can relax your face because you're relaxing your face shift. I'm actually your body. It's a why into relaxation. When we're really stressed, we get tension everywhere. When you meet someone, you can tell if they're strapped. You just look at their face, especially the eyes. So you know when you're thinking hard and concentrating on something, often there is stress. So when you're doing your tax return, that's what you look like. Thoughtful, but stressed. And you've done your tax return.:
Speaker 1:
30:07
Yeah, that's it on this session. Those are the things that I want you to know. I want you to know that you can connect with everything in a way that's frictionless through sound. It's the easiest way, and I can teach you a low loader. Meditations worked for some of you wouldn't work for the others, but everybody can experience meditation of no meditation for sound. You get your sense of place back, you'll enjoy the place you live, more the street you live in, it becomes different. You notice more. And then we've got the Prana Yama, which is the breathing exercise, which is in a way to prepare really for high stress situations cause he got to do it for 90 seconds, something like that. You don't have 90 seconds when you're in a difficult situation. When you're in a difficult situation, you've got one breath. That's how long you've got.:
Speaker 1:
31:01
And that final parts of the last meditation. So there was actually two, two things there. The first one was the four tens meditation. If you do that, you're learning to relax so that you're doing, you're doing eyes, jaw, shoulders and hands and it's for 10 seconds or four, 10 outbreath four times 10 hours. So yeah. So that last exercise was two things. It was the four tens meditation, which is teaching your body how to relax. You need to relearn how to relax the final bit. That's what you use. You learn to use that, come back to the breath, relax back to the breath, relax. One breath is enough to reset you. So if I'm driving along when the the white van driver from Hell tries to draw, run me off the road, pull in breath and relaxing out breath, that's what I call the relaxation response. It's a specific exercise you can do in your day.:
Speaker 1:
32:15
Yeah, I mean, yeah to an extent it is. When we sign, you're like I said, what we're doing is extending our outbreath because we're our bodies in relaxation mode and we tend to sigh as a result of some emotion. We, the body knows what we're doing is training at retraining ourselves in the thing that our body already knows. Breath is huge. You know what happens when somebody is angry? People sober, just go outside, take a handful of deep breaths. When somebody is angry, they say relax. They never say, don't be angry. They say relax. So those two things go hand in hand, extended out breath that you're aware of and relaxation, and then your, your body is only ever in stress or relaxation, one of the two. Stress or relaxation. Yes, that's it. You're intervening in the spiral and the spiral is only going to go one way down. So learn to intervene. Do it until you're calm. Remember to subscribe to whatever channel it is you found this podcast on so that you can hear some more. Feel free to feed back to me and let me know what you think and also what you'd like to hear in the future.:
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