More than just mindfulness

Stress

October 01, 2018 Season 1 Episode 5
More than just mindfulness
Stress
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Stress
Oct 01, 2018 Season 1 Episode 5
Robert Mitchell
A session in the park on stress. An explanation of what stress is and some techniques to manage it.
Show Notes Transcript
The first session of the 'modern life' mini-series. In which the regular Saturday meditation session was cancelled in favour of a noisy event in The Mansion and so we meditated in Beckenham Place Park in the Indian summer sunshine. During the session, the noisy event could be heard in the background and we were visited by a dog adorned with many bells. Topic: Stress. Meditations: The meditation of no meditation, The Destress meditation, Pranayama (4-6 breaths), Labelling the thoughts, Labelling unhelpful thought patterns
Speaker 1:
0:01
Hi everyone. Welcome to the mall and just mindfulness podcast series. This is a recording I did yesterday, Sunday the 29th of September. We meditate. How can employees park? It was a bit of an Indian summer and the topic is stress.:
Speaker 1:
0:24
This is the first of a 10 part mini series that I'm running within the podcast series itself. It's entitled modern life and it covers a number of different areas and modern life this week is stress followed by relaxation, loneliness, connection, anxiety, focus, wirey, calmness, sleep and happiness. These are all areas that mindfulness and meditation can improve your life in. In the session we cover stress, physiological stress, anxiety, worry, unhelpful thought patterns on our way to help cope with them and stop them from getting out of hand. And my cane life even more difficult than it is. So I hope you find it useful and remember to subscribe to whatever channel you use to get here.:
Speaker 1:
1:29
So the the Bryan is on the body is designed to motivate us to do whatever's necessary to reduce the potential threats in our lives. So let, let me give you an example. Let's go back 70,000 years. And we are a tribe and we like this spot. There's no buildings, there's no other people. 70,000 years ago, they were 70,000 human beings. The DNA tells us this. Now see me, I can figure out how many ancestors they were at any given time. Most of humanity was wiped out by a, an event which was the eruption of a large volcano somewhere in Indonesia, which destroyed many species known as an evolutionary bottleneck for most of humanity's existence. Population pressure hasn't been a problem. So what that means, he can go wherever you want. So let's say we decide this is a nice place to pitch our camp. We can see all around us.:
Speaker 1:
2:40
If there were any predators or hostile competitors, we will see them coming before they get to us. So we're about to protect ourselves. So we pitch our camp here and you go for a wander up over that hill and you get a few yards and there's a snake and see, you think, oh, all right, there are snakes. It's okay. You're used to, you know, you live in nature. So snakes and venomous spiders and predators and things like that. If you've got a spare or whatever, you'll hold it a bit tied to your walk round the snake and then you encounter another snake and you're thinking, I was a bit of a coincidence or, or whatever the terminology was 70,000 years ago. And so you go around that and you get to those loads of snake, you know, you've ever seen that. Then they were all slithering around and you think, right, what's actually happening is each time you encounter a successive snake, the ratchet of stress is being moved up.:
Speaker 1:
3:38
One more click. And what's supposed to happen is to, to make it so uncomfortable for you that you move away. So I come running back here or you come running back in and say, look guys, it's infested with snakes. Best coach somewhere else. Yeah. And as a whole bundle of things that have happened there. And one of them is the, the stress and trauma associated with encountering the snakes would stay in your memory. It's designed to stay in our memory. So the more traumatic something is, the more it's designed to stay in your memory. Why is that? Reason is we're nomadic. So we moved from here and then you know, next week we're in Bromley and then we moved to [inaudible] and then many, many decades later this area's changed slightly different flora and fauna. But we're walking along here and we'll remember, we might not be able to recall the exact experience, but it will give us a feeling, a sense that there's something not nice about this.:
Speaker 1:
4:48
And so then we'll move on from it. So all of these experiences that we notice in our lives, such as small things causing us high levels of stress, such as an memory, going back to something that happened 20 or 30 or 40 years ago and and keeping being pulled back there and even more often recently keeps going back to a recent experience over and over and over again. This is us behaving as designed. This is what we're designed for, where a sophisticated evolutionary design for living in nature in groups of 150 people. And what's happened is because of pressure of population and technology, we're living in groups of, in our case, 8 million in London, and there's very little nature and here in the park everybody's come here because this is what we're designed for. They're just come for a walk in the park. We just want to experience what we're designed to experience, which is nature and it's why there's so many of us here today to to do this meditation session in the park.:
Speaker 1:
6:13
It's because these things go together. Our natural environment where we feel more comfortable, we feel more comfortable here than we do in a room or in a car and our training to help to bring us back to a natural state, which is what mindfulness is. K. So look, let's look at stress. There's those three elements to it. Even if it's a repetitive stress or let's say it's the, the the weekly sales conference. It's a time limited thing. So there's the precursor to the stress. There's the stress or itself, there's the humiliation of not reaching your sales target in front of your colleagues. And then there's the consequences of it, which are psychological and consist of thoughts and emotions usually deeply connected or related to, oh, that was a humiliating experience and the next month that will be humiliating because nobody's buying ass stuff at the moment. And so subsequently we then project that experience into the future, which is what the brain's designed to do.:
Speaker 1:
7:29
And the consequences of that is, is you feel boxed in by all this. You feel that the, the, the thing that's causing the anxieties in the past, there's one in another two days and then you're going to feel rubbish afterwards. So what we'll do is we'll start at the end with the, we'll start with the, I feel rubbish and when we feel rubbish, what our society tells us is to do something to make yourself feel good. And because you're then distracted by the thing that makes you feel good, then you don't feel rubbish. But unfortunately what happens is whatever we do to feel good, there's a thing called habituation where you just get used to it. So doing it successively, over and over and over again, you get less and less benefit in the interim. Anxieties cranking up, ratcheting out ratchet, ratchet, ratchet. And when those two things cross, we become overwhelmed.:
Speaker 1:
8:26
The solution to that is to connect to the physical present moment, mindfulness, and we can do that right now we're really fortunate because there are so many different sorts of sound. I'm going to teach now what I teach for every session, which is the meditation of no meditation for sound. And I think we're in the perfect environment for it because why in the distance, there's some music coming from the mansion and then there's people walking past and there's dogs barking and there's some sort of clunking coming from behind the trees where the life got machines digging in the ground and there's the parakeets and there's the occasional airplane and there's a sound of my voice. And then there's movements in the group and then there's the traffic in the background and it's, it's an orchestra playing a theme and it's the theme of the present moment. And that's the exercise. The exercise is to notice and allow all of those sounds into your awareness. And the best way to experience it is by noticing your hair. So you are aware of sitting here and that the sounds are all around you. And what we're listening to is the hubbub of the sounds. And you'll notice how the mind gets drawn to specific sounds. And the modern mind stays with a sound. And then it looks for another sound. It looks for another sound.:
Speaker 1:
10:17
But at genetic mind, a human mind can sit in the center of all of these sounds and allow them to wash over us like waves in a pool.:
Speaker 2:
10:34
Okay,:
Speaker 1:
10:34
so we just practice this for the next few minutes sitting comfortably. There's no other instructions. It's not a meditation. Doesn't matter what the mind does, it doesn't matter if it's busy, it doesn't matter if your mind wanders, doesn't matter if you're comfortable or uncomfortable. If you're uncomfortable, move around, get comfortable. A notice. All of these sounds from all directions, from great distance, there's the airplane many miles away. There's music from the mansion about quarter of a mile away. And then there's all of these other sounds, the natural sounds all around us. So we're just going to buy even the sounds.:
Speaker 2:
11:45
Yeah. [inaudible] yeah. Huh? [inaudible] yeah. Yeah. [inaudible]:
Speaker 1:
14:47
so it just listening and notice the mind gets drawn to a particular sound and how it will stay there and notice where, how when you do that, your awareness of where you are goes with it. So if you're drawn into the sound of the clunking or the sound of the airplane, our, when it's have been at the center of all sound drifts away. And when we come back and listen to all sound, it physically locates us and the center of all of these sounds, and that's one of the keys to this is to use it as a way of locating yourself.:
Speaker 1:
16:04
Okay. So whenever you're ready and your very own time return your attention to your surroundings. What's that got to do with stress? Well, it's got quite a lot to do with stress actually because no, it's how you feel when you do something like that. Even here where there are sounds that the mind will nominate instantly as annoying or irritating when we now allow ourselves to become aware of all sound and they become part of our experience rather than being drawn to it. The irritation and annoyance goes away. And so some of you may note is that annoying sound back to noticing all sound annoying sound bites and noticing all sound, but also notice how you feel, which is almost universally the response is that this creates a sense of presence and calmness. And in it there is some meditation and then there was also some mindfulness.:
Speaker 1:
17:12
It intersect. Those two experiences don't teach it as a meditation, but I teach it as a practice. It's something that you can do during your day and each time you do this you're coming away from wherever the mind, wherever the needle is stuck in the record of the mind for a period of time. So this is a way into presence niche as a way in the presence. The breath is a way into presence, which is the presence is mindfulness, which is the undistracted awareness of the experience. The present moment. So nature returns your presence, noticing the breath, return to the presence, and noticing all sound return to your presence. So this is something that's very easy. It's a very frictionless why to become present during your day.:
Speaker 1:
18:14
There's another thing I'm going to teach you as well now, which is what I call the de stress meditation. Don't worry about remembering the order of it. It's on online, on soundcloud. So if you go on the soundcloud, Bromley, mindfulness, soundcloud is free in there is the de stress meditation and you can listen to that and then you can get used to the order. But the place to start off is this rubbing your hands together like this. Foster still, they are really warm. And then if you just put them down wherever they're most comfortable on, focus your attention on your hands. Um, what most people report is a tingling.:
Speaker 2:
19:02
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
19:03
a sensation of life. The blood flowing in the hands. And so what we're doing is allowing ourselves to become aware of the sensation in our hands of how our hands feel. I want, we need to do is to relax them. And the way we do that is by relaxing them on the out breath. When we breathe in, the body's in stress mode. When we breathe out, it's in relaxation mode. So we're using the out breath as a pump to pump whatever tension and pressure and stress there is in our hands out of our hands, just by gently releasing it. So when you first begin this, it might be difficult to learn to relax your hands. So one way to do it is to clench your fists when you breathe in and then release them when you breathe out. Yeah, finish. Then when you breathe in and release them, when you breathe out and on the outbreath, what you're doing is you're noticing the sensation of your hand or you're becoming aware of how it feels to relax your hands. So what were you do? You can, you can get that with about three or four fist clenches. And from then on we're aware of that sensation that we're looking for when we relax our hands. Breathing in normally, breathing out, relaxing the hands.:
Speaker 2:
20:54
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
20:54
Hi. Now I invite you to move your attention up to your shoulders and the back and sides of your neck. So if you can't feel the back of the sides of your neck, you just move your head from side to side and that gives you a little sensation. People are pretty good at relaxing. The shoulders will kind of know how to do that. And so same, same as with the hands breathing in normally.:
Speaker 2:
21:25
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
21:26
Breathing out. We're relaxing the hands, the back and sides of the neck and the shoulders.:
Speaker 2:
21:31
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
21:44
it's an APP. You place the palm of your hand very, very close to your forehead without actually touching it as close as you can get without touching. What you notice is the tingling of the hairs on the warmth of the palm. And so when you put your hand back down, you're now left with a sensation. You're aware of how your forehead feels. Yeah. And so the same as with the hands, the back and sides of the neck and the shoulders. Breathing in normally breathing out, relaxing the forehead.:
Speaker 2:
22:34
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
22:35
Breathing in normally breathing out, relaxing the eyebrows, and then slowly moving down the face. Place your tongue gently between the sharp part of your teeth. Breathing in normally breathing out, relaxing the eyes, and then the cheeks. Then the mouth and lips. Songs still in contact with the sharp part of the teeth. Relaxing the jaw.:
Speaker 2:
23:27
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
23:28
on relaxing the throat and then noticing the chest rising and falling.:
Speaker 2:
23:47
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
23:50
on the chest and by expanding and contracting.:
Speaker 2:
23:56
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
23:57
On the belly, rising and falling. And then what we're going to do now is relaxed all the lower part of the body. We'll start at the toes and the feet. So it might be just wiggling your toes.:
Speaker 2:
24:26
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
24:26
Noticing however it is, the toes and feet feel. No seeing the underside of your feet. The instep.:
Speaker 2:
24:49
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
24:50
And then without giving yourself a cramp, if you just squeeze your toes on the inbreath and relax on the out breath, squeezing your toes on the in breath, relax on the out breath and then relaxing the feet and then noticing however it is the coves feel is he can do this with any part of the body. Tightening the carves on the in breath, relaxing them on the out breath. It doesn't have to be very tight, just enough so that you're noticing the sensation tightening. No. Carve on the in breath. Relaxing it on the out breath.:
Speaker 2:
25:43
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
25:44
And now the thighs notice the sensation of the thighs in contact with the seat or the ground. Same with the thighs. Breathing in normally. Breathing out, relaxing the thighs and then the buttocks and hips.:
Speaker 2:
26:14
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
26:15
Relaxing the waste.:
Speaker 2:
26:22
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
26:23
On relaxing the lower belly.:
Speaker 2:
26:28
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
26:30
And the lower back? No, it's in the belly. Rising and falling.:
Speaker 2:
26:39
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
26:40
And relaxing the abdomen with each out breath. Relaxing the chest.:
Speaker 2:
27:00
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
27:01
Relaxing the upper back. No, it's the chest rising and falling of the chest and back. Expanding and contracting. Tongue still in contact with the sharp part of the teeth. Relaxing the throat. Relaxing the jaw.:
Speaker 2:
27:42
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
27:42
All on the out breath. Relaxing the mouth and lips. Relaxing the cheeks. The eyes.:
Speaker 2:
28:08
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
28:09
Eyebrows.:
Speaker 2:
28:13
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
28:15
No, it's the sensation of the forehead. Just relaxing the far forehead.:
Speaker 2:
28:28
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
28:28
And then the back and the sides of the neck. The shoulders.:
Speaker 2:
28:42
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
28:44
And finally the hands noticing how relaxed your hands are. Breathing in noticing whatever it is you can smell, whatever it is, you can taste the sensation of being pushed into the ground.:
Speaker 2:
29:13
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
29:14
And then when ever you're ready, in your very own time, maybe wiggling your fingers and toes gently return your attention to your surroundings.:
Speaker 1:
29:36
So usually the mind, if the mind goes somewhere that's an irritation, normally it takes the body where that, yeah, and so you feel anxiety or you feel stress. So anxiety is the emotion is our primitive brain communicating with us. That's how it communicates. Yeah. So this is like, there's a, there's a, a word that the Hindus use called body mind is the body mind responding to our experience in a conditioned why it's responding physiologically. It's getting you ready to respond to whatever the stress or is. And it's, it's sending you emotional signals telling you whether it's a reward or a threat, whether you move towards it or you move away from it. But no, it's the, even when there is a, an annoying or irritating noise when you relax, although the mind might still be drawn to something like clunking noises or repetitive music or something like that, the body hasn't been taken with it. You're still chilled, calm. And that's because you can intervene. These are different things as a different thing to intervene in the mind. I want to teach it to you. Now intervening in the body, we want two things. We want to relax and relaxing isn't sitting in front of the TV with a glass of wine. Well go into the pub with your mates. Relaxing is actually releasing the physiological tension in all of the muscles in your body.:
Speaker 1:
31:17
And if there's tension it's because you're prepared to deal with a threat. Modern life can appear like everything's a threat. So we need to intervene in our physiology and then we need to intervene in our emotions and then we need to intervene and our mind. So the best way to intervene in your motion, interestingly enough, is with the breath. Allow your lungs to empty fully. You see, you know, push all the air out empty fully. And then when you breathe in, focus your attention on the coolness of the breath, the lungs empty in their own time. Coolin breath, lungs, empty cooling breath. What I'm going to do is count the in breaths and the outbreath for you and then you can start doing it in your own mind. We're going to count the in breath for four seconds and while you do it, you're noticing that coolness in the nostrils.:
Speaker 2:
32:33
Okay?:
Speaker 1:
32:34
And then we're going to breathe out for six seconds. I, when we do that, we're going to relax, relaxing our face, our eyes, jaw, shoulders, and hands. Those are the areas to look for on the relaxation. So breathing in, cool nostrils, breathing out, relaxed body relaxation starts at the top, top of the head, moves down the body to the tips of the fingers and if you want down to the toes.:
Speaker 1:
33:12
And so on the in breath, what I'll do is I'll count to four seconds and then then the outbreath accounts or six seconds. And all you need to do is focus on the breath, cooling breath. Relaxing outbreath and then after a few rounds you can take over in, in your own minds, counting in your own mind, the inbreath and counting the outbreath. It's the only focusing on the coolness and the relaxation. So when the in breath is one, 1002 1003 1004 1000 outbreath two 1003 1004 1005 1006 1000 inbreath two 1003 1004 1000 outbreath two 1003 1004 1005 1006 1000 inbreath two, 1003 1004 1000 relax. Two 1003 1004 1005 1006 1000 coolness to 1003 1004 1000 relaxed. Two, 1003 1004 1005 1006 1000 take over in a moment. Count in four seconds on the inbreath. Six seconds on the out breath. Coolness on the in breath, relaxation on the outbreath.:
Speaker 2:
35:40
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
36:25
And again in your very own time, whenever your ready, returning your attention to your surroundings. Okay, so this is a different sort of calm to the calm at the end of the meditation of nine meditation for sound. Yeah. The calm at the end of the meditation meditation of sound was a calm sense of connection, but the body was still, however the body was. We'll have the stresses of the day where they were still there in your physiology and:
Speaker 1:
37:15
you'll your anxiety because he wouldn't go away. Why? Because of that. But it gets replaced while you're doing the meditation of no meditation for sound. It gets replaced by mindfulness, which is that that's underlies all of our other states of mind. When all the other states of mind, anger and stress and fear and motivation to will to achieve something or try to avoid something or whatever it happens to be. When that goes away and the anxiety that hangs around from one experience to another, that goes away and, and there's, there isn't an emotion or a physiological state. That's what's left is mindfulness. So that's how, that's our natural state. What's your cat walking across the lawn? Right. What it's doing is the meditation of no meditation for sound:
Speaker 1:
38:13
as it's noticing all the sounds and then when it hears a bird, it's head moves instantly so it's totally aware. So this is a natural state. Modern mind is denied it because of the modern life. Getting back to it, what we need to do is release those layers of emotion and stress that we're intervening and repetitive thoughts. The best thing for repetitive thoughts is this is a thing called labeling, and to teach it, I have to teach you a meditation, the labeling, the thoughts, meditation, the meditation is to train a practice that you can do in your day and informal practice. And the same way that when we do the meditation and no meditation for sound, I'm training so you can do it in your day. When you're standing in a queue or you're in a cafe or just about across the road or whatever it happens to be, you become aware of all sound.:
Speaker 2:
39:20
Okay?:
Speaker 1:
39:21
The labeling, law, thoughts, meditation. What we're doing is sitting quietly, uncomfortably noticing the breath ideally in the nostrils, but if that's uncomfortable, the movement of the belly could be anywhere in the body, chest rising and falling. Whatever's comfortable for you and all way using the breath. Fall is a reality check for the present moment. While we're noticing the breath, we know that we're here, the amine hasn't wandered and what we're doing is waiting like a cat sitting out of a mouse hole. Mouse is in their cat knows that if it waits long enough mouse or we'll have to come out. We're waiting for thoughts to arise. For those of us with a busy mind thought pops up straight away. If our mind is a bit quieter, it might be a bit of a gap and then out pops a thought and when a thought arises, what we do is we label it and our mind using the word thinking. So a noticing the breath, waiting for a thought. Well listening internally in the same way with a meditation of no meditation for sound, we listened to externally what? Listening internally waiting for that thought to pop up. The moment it does. We say in our mind thinking, come back to the breath.:
Speaker 1:
41:05
So this is the labeling, the thoughts, meditation. We're noticing the breath thought arises.:
Speaker 2:
41:12
Okay,:
Speaker 1:
41:13
label it thinking, returning our attention to the breath. Repeat, practice this for the next few minutes called the labeling the thoughts. And again, breathing in, noticing what you can smell, seeing what you can taste, the sensation of sitting or being pushed into the ground, what you can hear around you and gently return your attention to your surroundings. Okay, so:
Speaker 1:
44:38
I'm going to describe that experience and I get a kind of universal response. And the universal response is that you, and noticing the breath, your mind will pop up a thought. Sometimes there's a train of thoughts. So those of us with busy minds, which are eye is somewhere between 20 and 50% of the population. Not quite sure how many, but it's a, a very considerable number of us have got a constant train of thought, one after the other, after the other gap in the morning. And uh, the monkey mind, as we call it, it's chattering away all day, Yada, Yada, Yada. And so many people, 50% more than 50% something like 65% of students find this uncomfortable for just that reason because you're noticing how busy your mind is. And so when we do this, it becomes a noticing the breath thought arises, label it, thinking back to the breath or arises, label it thinking over and over and over again were sitting a thought pops up. We've become aware of the thought. We label it thinking and it's replaced by another thought. It might be on the same theme or the same topic, but it's uh, Morris dancing dog.:
Speaker 1:
46:07
I don't know where that came from. That was a thought. Notice. Notice how it works. So thought arises and it's gone. Which is one of the most powerful tools that I've learned. It's not the most powerful, but it's right up there. And now one of the things is we know that the mind pops up thoughts of all sorts or during the day. And some of them are helpful and some of them around the helpful. Some of them are useful, some of the repetitive, some of them have a life changing thoughts. So we don't want to not think, but what we want to do is two things. One is we want to know, we want to be able to map the landscape of our mind. We want to know is my mind spending too much time on this? Is it really going on and on and on about that thing that that person said three weeks ago, all day long and so on and so forth.:
Speaker 1:
47:09
And that, first of all we want to know, so this is the key to all meditation, which has become a familiar with the mind. And then the other thing we want to be able to do is squish the thoughts that are unhelpful, repetitive, pointless. You know the, the, the, you have a difficult interaction with someone or you're going to meet somebody and you know, it's going to be a different difficult interaction. The mount mine just goes round and round and round and round them out of that. And it comes a point where you think enough and without having this practice, I don't know of any other way to squish the thoughts. So what you do is this, you got in through the day and you're labeling your thoughts. When the thought pops up, you label it, you say, I'm thinking about that thing again. Or Oh I'm, I'm, I keep going over this or I'm worrying or I'm irritated or I'm keep judging or I keep comparing or whatever, whatever it happens to be.:
Speaker 1:
48:18
You just want to know and then pick the ones that are unhelpful. Start off with one that is not a big deal. Yeah. So I was teaching this to somebody yesterday and I've got a thought pattern that keeps going round and round and round. So the word we use when they notice that his turn tabling, because you know the record on the turntable goes round and round and round. This is actually about all to do with how they see themselves, how they think other people see them. But it keeps, it keeps coming back into their mind all the time. So what they do now is whenever they notice that they say in their mind, turn tabling and come back to the cool in breath and the relaxing outbreath and then carry on doing what you're doing, it does it again. Turn tabling, cooling, breath, relaxing out breath.:
Speaker 1:
49:28
And it doesn't matter how many times you have to do that because you're going to have to breathe all day anyway, and what you're doing is you're using it to squish something that's unhelpful for your happiness. And this is what I call labeling unhelpful thought patterns because they're repetitive, persistent, unhelpful thought patterns. Identify it, find a silly name for it. Don't use the name of what it is. Yeah, because if you're a worrier, the last thing you need to do is keep labeling. You worry, worry, worry. While you're a worrier, what you're going to do, you're going to worry more. So we don't use the word that describes the pattern. We use a word that we can remember that might not even be connected to it. We're have to move. That's fine. Up pops the unhelpful thought pattern. We're going to move. Cool and breath. Relaxing. Outbreath:
Speaker 2:
50:32
Kate. Gavin. Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
50:34
So they they use are all techniques to bring you back into balance after:
Speaker 2:
50:41
some stressful.:
Speaker 1:
50:44
Actually the, the technique I taught you, the cooling breath, relaxing out breath that you can use anywhere. So that's what I use. If I feel my emotions rising and intervene before I say something stupid that I regret.:
Speaker 2:
51:05
And I know I've got:
Speaker 1:
51:07
50 years of experience of saying things that I regret. And so what you're then doing is you're training yourself to intervene in unhelpful thought patterns that are rattling away during the day. You're able to bring yourself back to balance, back to presence, back to the present moment. And you're also able to intervene. But it takes training. So you need to do it regularly and s baby steps always with these things. Baby steps, you know, if your, if you're the world's greatest worry or, and you try using this, the minute you walk away it's not going to work. You need to pick something little try on that. See it work. Then your emotional brains on board cause it thinks I don't have to listen to myself beating myself up about this thing again. But it needs to work first on something smaller and then you can, you can label all the big deals. K. So that's Today's session on stress. Next week is relaxation. Thanks for listening. Hope you found that useful. Remember to subscribe to whatever channel you use to get here. Next week session is relaxation and I hope you have a stress free week and next week we'll teach you how to have a relaxing week. Have a great week.:
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