More than just mindfulness

Relaxation

October 06, 2018 Season 1 Episode 6
More than just mindfulness
Relaxation
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Relaxation
Oct 06, 2018 Season 1 Episode 6
Robert Mitchell
How to learn to reduce stress, sleep better and become calmer through relaxation.
Show Notes Transcript

In which Robert explains why relaxing doesn't need deserted beaches, waving palm trees and hazy sunsets, teaches how to meditate without finding the time to meditate and how to relax by changing your posture. 
Including: the counting the breaths meditation, following the breath, checking in, the destress meditation and the relaxation response.

Speaker 1:
0:00
So today's subject is relaxation. These words get stolen by our culture and our society, especially by marketing. So if you go to Google and you type in relaxation, what you get is a load of images of people with a Hammock slung between a couple of palm trees and strolling down a deserted beach. Has anybody ever seen a deserted beach on holiday? I haven't, but they managed to. I think what happens is they get up at five o'clock in the morning on a day that there are no tourists just to take these pictures very our four hours later it's deluge. It's interesting that they've kept the concept of nature and being pretty much alone without millions of people around you as part of relaxation. Society's idea of relaxation is something that they can sell you and that will be travel. It will be leisure activities, it will be spa, io, vedic breaks and I'm not knocking them, but they come with a significant price tag.:
Speaker 1:
1:05
All of this stuff is associated with relaxation and its consequence of 21st century life that we've, I suppose the best way to put it is lost connection with our bodies and our physiology to the extent that we can't relax. And so people have to do things to relax. Think about that for a moment. Relaxation is the releasing of physiological tension in muscular skeletal system, and what happens is our physiology and our minds, so mine's, let's say that thoughts and emotions, emotions are the body sending us a message. That's how our body and our primitive brain communicates with us. We can't communicate with it. Don't know if you've ever noticed that. It's a one way traffic. Your emotional primitive brain communicates with you all the time. It will make you tense, it will make you stressed, it will make you whatever it wants to make you, and you can't convince it not to do that.:
Speaker 1:
2:13
For example, you need to seek in public and it's important to you. You can't give yourself a talking to if you're anxious about it because you've got natural thing which is called performance anxiety. You can't say, look, emotional brain, this is important for my career, so let's stop being, it doesn't work right. Instead it's going anxious, anxious, anxious, so it's a one way street. Actually it isn't a one way street, but we have to learn to communicate back. There's things that we can change. We ultimately have the thinking. Brian has the capacity to on our physiology and the capacity to choose to focus on having the time to enable us to have that conversation and the way that we can have the conversation with the primitive brain and the, the, the body, the physiology, our physiological responses to our experience is really through two things because we need to speak in the language of the body. Yeah. One is relaxation and the other is managing the breath because this is the, this is the language that the body uses to alert us to the fact that something terrible is happening. We need to be able to respond to the body and breathing and relaxation of the ways that that happens and we can intervene in that. So what is relaxation? Tense. Relaxed. Fist clenched tense. First hand, relaxed.:
Speaker 1:
4:10
That's it. So you think, well that's easy enough. I can do that. Yeah. Right. Okay. Hands up. Anyone who can relax there. Florida will. Okay. No, 95% of us. And, and this is based on my subjective analysis of getting people to put their hands up if they can feel their forehead. There isn't a connection, there isn't a physiological feedback loop. And the loop starts with me focusing on my forehead and then getting back sensation. What, how does it feel? Um, and so, so what's the point? The feeling you forward? Well, it's part of your face and the face is where we maintain our stress the most and the way we maintain it the most is through tension. So if you've got this scrunched up ground, TIF, Browning, squinting leaning, head forward expression, if you want us to go and see that go a Bromley south station in the morning at seven 30 in the morning and everybody that walks into there has got that expression on their face.:
Speaker 1:
5:16
All of them. Yeah. Go to London Bridge in the morning and watch the seemingly infinite conveyor belt of people, nine deep walking towards the city over London Bridge. It's one of the great events of the modern world. It's like the march of the penguins, but for human beings, yeah, they're, there are, they are and they aren't. I think everybody needs to have the experience of trying to walk the other way because it's nine deep and you know when there's lots and lots of people or going in a particular way how day you've go the other way and they won't bump into you. They get pretty close, but they won't bump into you at some level. They're aware of it at many levels. They're completely unaware. They're all an example of the modern mind at work. It's mind wandering. Nobody's there. They're not actually walking across London Bridge. They're having some meeting with somebody where some outlet county or the all day worrying about what emails are going to be in their inbox when they arrive or whatever it might happen to be.:
Speaker 1:
6:28
And I know because I did that for 35 years. Well, not London. Well, sometimes London Bridge, tower bridge, I've you know, done pretty much every commute, canary wharf, the West End, Clark and while the city, and it's all the same. It's a process of people who are in their mind and they're not here right now. So that expression that's stressful expression is as a result of the stress response and what the stress response is is our body and the primitive parts of our brain and the primitive parts of our brain is what keeps us alive and what he's trying to do is to respond to its external environment and prepare us for the threats that it perceives. It's unfortunately the thinking brain perceives the threats and then the thinking brain triggers the body into responding to threats. When you feel stressed and anxious, then subsequently you worry and worrying is even if it's temporary, even if it's just something that pops up, it tends not to be, tends to be repetitive and persistent and then that's, that's triggering the body body triggers the brain negative feedback loop.:
Speaker 1:
7:49
We need to be able to intervene. That's where relaxation comes in. You need to be able to learn to switch off the tension in your body. So let me give you an example of, so now I've made all these wild assertions about how your brain triggers your body. Let's go. Let me give you an example. So if you close your eyes and imagine you're in the kitchen at home and you've got a chopping board and the sharp knife unit you use to cut lemons in half and a lemon, and you put the lemon on its side and cut length ways into the lemon, cut it in half and cut the lemon in your palm and lift it up. Move it towards your face, open your mouth, slide the lemon halfway into your mouth bite right the way down into the middle of it. And you can open your eyes now.:
Speaker 1:
8:49
So did anybody notice anything happening in their mouth? Yeah. Salivation. Yeah. What's happening there is we've created a concept in our mind that doesn't exist and our body's responding to it and we don't get to chose. That is what it's like to be human, right? Something in your mind, your body responds, responds to it. You don't get to choose and then your body is responding based on whatever the mind's constructed. So if you happen to believe, for example, that the world's a hostile place, what will happen is your body will respond to it as if, as if it's encountering hostility everywhere. If you listen to the media or the news or anything like that, I suggest you don't. But if you do, the the hysteria that's coming out of it is palpable now. And what it's doing is, is is, is making everybody edgy. What actually happens is that finds its way into society and then we, our perception of each other becomes a hostile one.:
Speaker 1:
9:54
And we perceive other people as threats and that's uncomfortable and unhelpful for all of us because when you perceive other people to be hostile, you're suspicious and skeptical and cynical about everything they do and say. And so that diminishes your capacity to connect with people. Somebody talks to you at the bus stop and you're in Manchester. That's just someone talking to you at the bus stop. If somebody talks to you in the bus stop in in London, Oh no, this person is speaking to me at the bus stop. What do they want? What could it be? And so we've become fragmented and disconnected. The emotional brain notice is this, and it responds with stress. This is a kind of extension of what we did last week. So I put these together, their stress, but the body is only ever in one state or another. At a high level, it's in stress or relaxation.:
Speaker 1:
10:46
There's a thing called the autonomic nervous system and is like a switch. Stress, relaxation, stress, relaxation. You learning to relax is a way of enabling yourself to intervene in this entire process, the entire negative feedback loop of modern life and the modern mind. But to do it, you need to spend the time to learn, to relax. So how do you do that when you're, everything's so busy, very simple. What you do is you do these before you go to sleep at night for the modern world, we need a new way of fitting in this extra thing to do. And you know, instead of, you know, having to compete with everything else in your life for your meditation, you do it before you go to bed. It's called beditation is the new way. I'll start off with a couple of meditations that are designed to help us to calm our mind.:
Speaker 1:
11:57
So when we do this, for those of you that are experienced meditators, you might have a better meditation to calm your mind, in which case you do that. Um, if you're reasonably new, I'm teaching this because of the meditations that there are that calm the mind. This is the one that works the best for most people. My analysis tells me about 45% of people, nearly half of students find that this is the meditation that helps them to calm the mind the most. And it's the one that I use to calm my mind if it ever gets really busy. It's called counting the breaths to meditate. For those of you that are new, what I'll do is I'll run through the posture from the perspective of enabling you to be able to relax.:
Speaker 1:
12:52
One of the consequences of stress in our lives is the our posture responds to the stress and what the posture tends to be is a leaning forward posture for a whole lot of reasons. All to do with evolutionary physiology and psychology too. Longwinded to go into right now this is something that meditation teachers do that but they teach it from the perspective of you do this rather than from the perspective of this is why you do this. So the reason why we have a specific posture for meditation is because it helps us to relax. The thing to look for primarily comfort. If your body's comfortable, there's a chance that it's going to be relaxed after comfort. The next thing you're looking for is a straight back so you can set up so that your back is balanced on top of your spine. So that is not in contact with the back of the chair or you can lean back against the back of the chair or you might be sitting on the floor or you might find that leaning back is more comfortable for you.:
Speaker 1:
14:03
But if you do lean back, what you want is your back to be as straight as he's comfortable and the comfort of your back and the comfort of your posture will indicate to you once you've adjusted the correct posture straight back. And then the other thing that makes a difference is placing your elbows by your side. If your elbows are in front of you, you're pulling your body forward because you're putting your body forward. You'll have to hold it up. Do you using all the muscles at the back and sides of the neck, the shoulders, and down the middle of the back to stop yourself from falling forward. And what we're looking for is a balanced posture, placing the elbows by the side.:
Speaker 2:
14:52
The arms are pulled down at the side and we're not leaning forward anymore, quite balanced. And because we're balanced, we don't need to use any muscles to hold up the torso. And because of that, I can relax. And then the next thing is the skull. That's something we don't normally think about. Things to look for is the place where the scale is balanced on top of the spine.:
Speaker 3:
15:21
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
15:21
Balanced. Uncomfortable.:
Speaker 3:
15:25
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
15:26
So the greatest comfort means the least muscles are in action means the more relaxed you are. So I'm notice how adopting this posture alters your physiology.:
Speaker 3:
15:46
Okay?:
Speaker 2:
15:46
Lots of muscles are no longer in use. Those muscles can then relax. Your body's balanced and you feel more comfortable. Of course, this is something you can do wherever you are. Whatever you're doing could be washing the dishes, it could be sitting in your car while you're walking. Notice your posture while you're walking. You're in a meeting listening to the PowerPoint from hell. Adjust your posture and it becomes just a little bit less hellish. And then once we're aware of the balance in our body, then we were aware of the breath. And so if you, if you do count in the breaths, begin by noticing the sensation of the breath. So start it just by becoming aware of the breath. Place your tongue gently up against the back of the top teeth. As most of us have an overbite, ill notice that it's in contact with the sharp part on the bottom teeth that will cause your jaw to relax. That will help your face to relax and you're also then breathing in and out through the nostrils. Breathing in and out through the nostrils is power because we breathe more deeply cause we breathe more deeply. We're utilizing more of the lungs because he utilize more of the lungs. The oxygen transfer improves because there's more oxygen in our blood. We feel more energized, we feel less tired, we feel less irritated. Just changing how we stand and sit can change our state of mind really considerably.:
Speaker 2:
17:35
And then when noticing the air in the nostrils, if it's uncomfortable for you, then you can notice the movement of the belly or wherever you're aware of the breath.:
Speaker 3:
17:46
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
17:46
And you're noticing the breath rising and falling. Yeah, and and leaving the nostrils. No. Seeing the cycle of coolness and warmth, cooling, breath, warm out breath. Notice our relationship to the breath we're chain yet it's like we're sitting on a beach watching the waves rolling up, washing away.:
Speaker 3:
18:22
Okay,:
Speaker 2:
18:24
so we're not causing the breath to happen, which is one of the things that often occurs when were following, following the breath or counting the breath. As a tendency, a mic. The breath happen instead west sitting quietly and we're noticing it happen and you'll notice some breaths are deeper than others, some breaths along the than others. Some breasts don't seem to happen this whole tiny and that's fine because the body knows how much oxygen it needs so it will regulate your breath to get the oxygen it needs and so to counts in the breaths. What we do is count the breath sinner mind using the inner voice. We count one on the in breath to on the out, press three on the in breath for on the outbreath humps the 10 when we get to 10 come back to one start again. When we lose count, start at one again. So one on the in breath till when the outbreath three on the in breath following the outbreath upsets hand gets a 10 begin at one lose count began at one well is I begin and end the meditation with a bell. I'll guide you into this. It's an ancient technique. It's called counting the breath.:
Speaker 2:
20:01
That's what, just noticing the breath counting as the price goes from the cycle. Breathing in, breathing out, rising, falling. We're just noticing it and counting. One on the in breath till on the out. Press three on the in breath, fall on the out, breath up to 10 gets a 10 begin at one, lose count began on one. Counseling the practice. Just practice this for the next few minutes,:
Speaker 3:
20:45
right? [inaudible]:
Speaker 1:
24:12
can I start breathing in? Noticing whatever it is you can smell, whatever it is. He can taste the feeling of your feet on the floor, the sensation of sitting and noticing the sensation and your fingers and toes and general.:
Speaker 3:
24:29
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
24:30
Return your attention to the room.:
Speaker 1:
24:39
So those of you that are experienced, you've got your meditation that you use to calm your mind and you would have been doing that there. For those of you that are relatively new to this as kind of 50 50 chance, your mind will either be calmer or eel have noticed. It's busier during that. If your mind became busy during counting the breaths, there's a very good chance that the meditation I taught last week will calm your minds as thing called labeling the thoughts because people tend to either have their minds calmed by counting the breath. So I have their minds calm by labeling the thoughts. So you can pick up last week's podcast in there is labeling the thoughts. If you found that your mind was busy during counting the breaths, try labeling the thoughts. We're doing this because whenever we do any work, ideally we want to start off by calming the mind cause it's going to get in the way.:
Speaker 1:
25:38
One of the ways it's going to get in the way, he's by wandering. So you know as I explained the relaxation posture, what I call the open balanced and relaxed posture. And notice what you did is you, you checked in what I would call checking in with the body so you can check in with your body for a whole load of reasons. One is is you might want to check what your emotional state is and the other thing you might want to check in with your body and see how much stress there is, how how tense you are, and it's useful for this to become a habit so that you're doing it during the day to make something a habit or we need to do is do it lots. So there's a meditation called following the breath, which is the staple main mindfulness meditation that's taught throughout the world and has been for the last two and a half thousand years at least.:
Speaker 1:
26:37
And what it consists of is is noticing the breath and what happens is the mind wanders and then become aware of that. You bring your attention back to the breath and it happens again and you repeat that. You do that for sort of however long you meditate for. Now what we're going to do is add another element to that and the other element is when your mind wanders and you bring your attention back, you're not just going to notice the breath. You're also going to check in with your body to see if you're in an open, balanced and relaxed posture. And the way to settle into an open balance, relaxed posture is obviously to check to see. This is why we call checking it and you're checking to see if your back straight or elbows or by your side, if your scale is balanced. And then to settle into it, we just need a single outbreath so you're breathing in. Normally when you breathe out, you're allowing yourself to settle in, in a relaxed way into that posture. And then you can go back to notice in the Bronx. So following the breath is just noticing the breath. We're just aware of it happening. If the mind's busy, their mind's busy. If your mind wanders, your mind wanders.:
Speaker 2:
27:53
If you're uncomfortable,:
Speaker 1:
27:54
move your body so you're comfortable. That's all there is to it. Uh, in this case, when we notice how our mind's wandered, instead of just coming back and noticing the breath, we also check in with our body. Notice if our postures open, balanced and relaxed. And if not settling into an imbalanced and relaxed posture. Relaxing on the out breath. And then going back to noticing the breath.:
Speaker 2:
28:24
So the script for this is, notice the breath. Mind Wanders. Notice that the mind's wandered. Check him with the body. Relax into your posture. Notice the breath, mind wanders. Notice that the mind's wandered. Come back to the body. Check in, relax. Notice the breath. Repeat. Okay.:
Speaker 1:
28:53
Sorry. If you just want to get yourselves comfortable, assist, just following the breath. The only differences when you notice your mind's wandered, you check in with your body and relax.:
Speaker 3:
29:08
Okay?:
Speaker 1:
29:08
Eh, every so often I'll pipe up just in case your mind is very, very busy and you spend the entire time with your mind.:
Speaker 2:
29:17
I'm trying just to give you a little nudge from time to time. So I'm noticing the breath. Mind Wanders, become aware of the mind's wandered. Check in with our body. Relax. Come back to noticing the breath. Oh, ideally in the nostrils, tongue against the back of the top teeth. And I send the cycle and rhythm of the breath. Coolness and the warmth. The sensation of the breath. Cool. Following the breath.:
Speaker 3:
30:03
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
30:56
Cool. Breath in. Long breath out. So it's not a competition to stay focused on the breath. It's not an attempt to silence your mind. So you're not trying to silence the, that's not competition and do anything. So subsequently, there's no such thing as a bad meditation. Your mind wanders, your mind wanders. Soon as you notice, check em with the potty. Relax, come back to the breath. That's what's supposed to happen. My mind is suppose to Wanda. That's why we focus on something as neutral as the breath.:
Speaker 3:
33:37
Cool.:
Speaker 2:
34:43
The mind one does a thousand times. All we do is gently patient a compassionately return our attention back to the body, noticing any tension or letting it go on the out breath, checking in on our posture, noticing the breath. Do that a thousand times. Each time the mind wanders, we return to the breath,:
Speaker 1:
35:41
breathing in, notice him or whatever it is. You can smell. Taste the sensation of setting your feet, being pushed into the ground and bring your attention. Parts here, surroundings.:
Speaker 1:
35:58
So there's this thing called homeostasis. One of the definitions is equilibrium. Everything's balanced. And that's actually how we're designed to be and homeostasis. So if you read some of the great neuroscientists like Antonio Demasio, he talks about consciousness and he gets to consciousness from the basic physical notion that we're seeking a balance. What we want is this balanced equilibrium, internal and external and whatever. The balance is upset, the body responds. So when we see external balance being upset, our minds respond and our physiology responds and then we respond and this is happening inside us as well. When everything's connected, it's all connected mind, body anxiety, it's all there and it's the end goal of this physiologically is to be able to bring your physiology back in balance. If you are talking in front of a lot of people, you want to feel some anxiety because you're somewhere where you need to perform, but you don't want it to be out of control.:
Speaker 1:
37:19
So we don't, we don't want to stop ourselves feeling a particular way. We just want it to be in proportion to the experience. What's the worst thing that can happen? You say something dumb, fluffy, align. Everybody stares at the ceiling wishes you'd go away, you've learned from it, and you come back and do it again. It's not a problem, but the body has got a different idea. And so what we want to do is keep bringing our body in a balance over and over and over again and learning to get comfortable with the uncomfortable experiences so that they don't become overwhelming. And then the feedback loop doesn't get triggered and we can intervene in it. And so what we're going to do now is teach you a relaxation meditation. Reason it works is because your one, you're connecting with your physiology and connecting isn't a hippy, we were word. It's are you getting the feedback? Are you aware that your face is stressed, that your shoulders are stressed, that your hands are stressed, that your voice, the vibes you're giving off a stressful vibes, all of that you need to know. There's a thing called the de stress meditation. So this is online on soundcloud. If you, if you find it:
Speaker 2:
38:36
difficult to remember the order and you like prefer being guided, you can go on the soundcloud. Look up my de stress meditation. It's in there. Just fine. Bromley mindfulness on soundcloud. It's on the website anyway:
Speaker 1:
38:50
and the whites to start off. It's like this. Rubbing your hands together. Rub Your hands together and you do it really fast. And then you place your hands wherever they're comfortable remembering the keep your elbows by your side and focus your attention on the sensation in your hands.:
Speaker 2:
39:10
A notice, however the hands feel and what you'll notice is there might be a tingling. You might still feel the warmth of the hands. Whenever I do this, I notice that I can feel the pulse so I can actually feel my heartbeat in my hands without having to check it with my fingers.:
Speaker 2:
39:40
You might feel the blood flowing. You might feel a sense of life in your hands. And this is useful because we're not connected to our hands. We getting physiological feedback from our hands. We understand how they feel and so now we need to be able to relax them. It's quite important because you know, you think about people wringing their hands and clasp in their hands and making fists and drumming their fingers. It's an emotional part of the body. The hands. Yeah, and we want to relax them, so to relax them. If you're a beginner and you aren't aware of how to relax your hands, and the way to do it is when you're breathing in, what you do is clench your fists not too tightly, but tightly enough. And when you breathe out, just relax them and let the fingers open like the petals of a flower in the morning. Breathing in, tightening your first breathing out, hands opening and relaxing. You don't. He needs to do that about three or four times. And what you're doing is you're programming into yourself, into your brain, what it feels like to relax your hands so it didn't know. Come now a learning.:
Speaker 3:
41:03
Hmm.:
Speaker 2:
41:05
I want you to have done that a few, few times. Then what you do is you're just noticing the sensation of the hands. Breathing in normally, breathing out, relaxing the hands, just letting out the tension and tightness.:
Speaker 3:
41:25
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
41:27
Let me calm, relaxed them instantly. So we need to do that over a few breaths. Just relaxing the hands a little bit more on each out breath.:
Speaker 3:
41:40
Okay,:
Speaker 2:
41:42
now and I invite you to bring your attention to your shoulders. Notice how your shoulders feel. And here we can check in on our posture again, our elbows by our side, our shoulders pulled forward, oral, they almost pulling the shoulders down by the side.:
Speaker 3:
42:08
Okay?:
Speaker 2:
42:10
On most people find it reasonably easy to relax. Their shoulders says something we don't forget. Okay? Seem to keep that throughout our adult life. So breathing in, breathing out, gently, relaxing the shoulders.:
Speaker 3:
42:33
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
42:35
No, it's on the out breath. Shoulders sinking, rising on the in breath, folding on the out, breath and relaxing. There's life whole. And now the invitation is to notice the sensation of the backhand sides of the neck. If you can't feel anything much there, you just move your head from side to side. And then that focus is your awareness on the back and the sides of your neck. And you'll notice the sensation there. You're then connected. Check his scowl at shore. It's comfortably balanced. On top of the spine. And the same is with us. Shoulder and hands. Jen, a relax the back and sides of the neck. All on the out breath.:
Speaker 2:
43:52
Hi Tony. Generally up against the back of the top teeth, just gently and colon site with the sharp part of the bottom teeth. And now we're going to learn to connect to our forehead. If you place your fault, your palm of your hand, very, very close to the forehead without actually touching it. So it's just a kind of a quarter of an inch away from your forehead, your notice the warmth of the palm and there's a tiny little tingling on the little hairs in the forehead. And if you put your palm back down again, you're left with a sensation. So keeping the tongue up against the sharp part of the bottom. Teeth breathing in normally, breathing out, relaxing the forehead and gently moving down the face in normally breathing out, relaxing the opera house. Relaxing the eyes.:
Speaker 3:
45:04
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
45:06
relaxing the cheeks. Relaxing the mouth and the lips. Checking in with your posture. Tongue against the sharp part of the teeth. Relaxing the jaw.:
Speaker 3:
45:31
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
45:35
relaxing. We'll throat. I'm noticing the chest rising and falling, a chest and back. Expanding and contracting on the abdomen. Belly rising and falling.:
Speaker 3:
46:04
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
46:05
And if you focus your attention on a point just below the belly button on halfway between the ballet and the lower back, right in the center of your body. And then from there, noticing that you're able to notice the belly rising and falling and then relaxing the belly. Relaxing hips Weist allow a back on each out breath, uh, thighs, the buttocks and the hips. KP unawareness. Awareness of that tiny little spot just below the belly part and halfway between the pally on the lower back. Okay. And then relaxing the belly. Relax in the abdomen. Would you mean pack? Help the party, relaxing the chest and upper back. So the breadth is acting like a pump. It's pumping out tension, pressure and stress on each out breath.:
Speaker 3:
47:49
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
47:50
So I'm still gently up against the sharp part of the teeth and then moving up the face, checking in with your posture. Relaxing with throat, breathing in, breathing out, relaxing the jaw.:
Speaker 3:
48:17
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
48:17
Breathing in, breathing out, relaxing the mouth and lips. The cheeks.:
Speaker 3:
48:33
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
48:34
Oh is:
Speaker 3:
48:40
okay.:
Speaker 2:
48:41
Eyebrows. But so the fluoride and then noticing the back and sides of the neck. No, it's offended. No, it's if any tensions, crack packing. It does sometimes just letting it out again. It's like we've blown up a balloon or holding it. Pinch shot with two fingers and each time we breathe out we're just laying a little bit of air out. The balloon become softer.:
Speaker 3:
49:18
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
49:21
In the back and sides of the neck. Relaxing the shoulders and relaxing the hands. It's how relaxed the hands are. So now what we want to do is relax her entire body and learn bit by bit by doing this every evening when we get to bad learning to relax the entire body on an outbreath.:
Speaker 3:
49:53
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
49:54
And the ways to do that is to breathe in fully, not filling your lungs right up. Breathing fully, starting at the top of the head and the forehead. I was Zulu. Breathe out, relax in the eyes. Your shoulders and hands sound against the sharp part of the Tafe, like a wave of relaxation. Moving down the body through the feet, into the ground. Breathing in fully top of the head, eyes, jaw, shoulders down to the tips of your fingers, towns here, feet:
Speaker 1:
50:28
and into the ground. And then uh, seamless sensation of sitting gently allowing your awareness to written.:
Speaker 2:
50:55
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
50:55
So the surroundings, what you can here:
Speaker 2:
50:58
you can smell, you can taste and what you can say.:
Speaker 1:
51:14
So it's, it's all connected. Yeah. So relaxing your body relaxes your mind, reduces your anxiety, brings you back into balance. While back we had the joy of listening to a musical sound check outside. They did warn us that was going to be a sound check halfway through the meditation session. And so what I did is I time to relaxation meditation from when the sound check started and I expected them to go up there and go, we get them to two, one to two, which is what you do. I mean the reason for that is you're checking levels its professional. Instead the guy got out there and played ground control to major Tom as loudly as he possibly can, would have been irritating. But the irritation goes away. The irritation goes away because your relaxing your body. Keep that in mind. And I said, was anybody ever its height? And then we'll go, no, it was fine.:
Speaker 1:
52:18
Yeah. If we'd have been focusing on the breath, that would have been different. Many people would have found it irritating and frustrating. You're note is how everything's connected and this is how the thinking brain intervenes in the permit. If Brian's attempts to unbalances helps to bring us back in a balance is bias intervening and our physiology, the breathing Pranayama is focusing on the breath and this relaxation. Last thing we did relaxing the entire body relaxation response. You learn to do that and you can just turn the tables in 95% of the situations you find yourself in where you're on the back foot. Okay, so that's it. Next week is loneliness.:
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