More than just mindfulness

Focus

November 07, 2018 Season 1 Episode 10
More than just mindfulness
Focus
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Focus
Nov 07, 2018 Season 1 Episode 10
Robert Mitchell
Learning how to focus on returning to the present moment and then learning how to focus within the present moment
Show Notes Transcript

In which Robert explains that meditation and mindfulness both consist of learning to focus our awareness.
Essentially Presence (mindfulness) is focusing *on* the experience of the sensory present moment and practicing certain meditation helps us to focus *within* the sensory present moment.
We also learn to notice what is part of our common experience and what we personally bring to the present moment based on our individual experience.
Meditations this wee are:

Speaker 1:
0:00
This is conceivably don't intersection of everything that my meditation teacher teachers focus to understand what I mean by that because we usually use the term to explain two things. Obviously camera has focus but as well as that your focused, if you're working hard on something, if you get down the gym every Thursday you're focused on your training. If you're studying hard, you're focused on learning and so on and so forth and focus does come in some meditation and come into mindfulness in a really big way. Let me try and explain why. So if aliens came down to planet earth and asked me what it's like to be human, well I do is explain this:
Speaker 1:
1:02
being human is like being in a cinema on your own. There you are, you're in the movie theaters, all these rows of seats and there's nobody else in there. There are three screens in front of you and they're super imposed in front of each other. The first two are semi transparent so you can, depending on what you focus on, the images in the screen, you're able to view any one of these screens is the past ones. The present. I'm one's the future. You can't instigate any actions. You can't change what's showing on these screens. Yeah. Just sitting there watching them past, present, future and the mind will wander to the past and the future and it will get stuck in them. So you get stuck in this movie, the story, the narrative of the past, all the narrative of the future. And mindfulness is all about noticing that and bringing your attention to the screen in the middle of the screen of the, the present moment.:
Speaker 1:
2:14
And the, the reason that you want to do that, there's lots of reasons. One is because of what it isn't. It isn't your story about the past and it isn't your story about the future. And in the 21st century, for most of us, this is where our suffering is, although pain is in the present moment. So let's say go out into the street and I, I get not tova and, and they can't be off to the hospital and I'm in pain, right? Maybe I'm disabled, so God dodgy like now and I can't get round as well as I used to. There's two things going on. One is the challenges and limitations of having a dodgy leg and the other is how I feel about myself and how I feel other people feel about me. Okay. The first one, the dodgy leg is pine. It's mandatory.:
Speaker 1:
3:10
It's adversity, part of life. Nothing we can do about it, but how I feel about myself and how I feel about how other people feel about me, I own that. That's mine. And that's optional. So pain is mandatory. Suffering when I talk about suffering is the optional element. It's the how we perceive ourselves and how we perceive our experiences and how we perceive other people perceive us and so on and so forth. That's within us. And it's something that can be let go off if it's unhelpful, but it lives in these little stories of the past. There's the newly disabled Robert and he meets these people and he perceives that they just look at me as a disabled person, which is what disabled people say. They say, you know, I'm not who I am. I'm a disabled person. And all that is that is a consequence of our culture.:
Speaker 1:
4:14
And our culture is just a consequence of what happens when you get millions and billions of people. And then there's all this history comes into it and, and it, and it muddles up. But the me that I am is still the me that I am. And I find that me in the present moment, in the past and in the future I'm, I'm not there, I'm here. So I want to be in that present moment. And the other reason I want to be there is cause then I get to choose. I get to choose which movie I watch, the past, the present or the future and how I apply my mind. Because the mind is the filter for everything in your experience, everything out of the past, everything you're experiencing now, everything in the future. We did this little exercise the other week where we look up at the ceiling and everybody's going to get a different view of the ceiling based on what your past has consisted of.:
Speaker 1:
5:15
So it's the same thing and there's many, many different views of it. And what you're doing is you're adding the filter of your experience to, to the ceiling. But ultimately it's a collection of colors and shapes and textures and contrasts and patterns and reflections and light and dark. That's the common reality. And then what happens is we impose our past, our experience and our perceptions of it on it. And that's what we do with everything from our past and what we perceive to be our future and the US that we perceive. It becomes a filter in everything. And sometimes that's helpful and sometimes that's unhelpful. But trust me, if you're suffering, it's in here and it's how you're seeing yourself and how you're seeing the world. And it is all a process of learning to let go of that. But to do it, you have to start from here.:
Speaker 1:
6:20
The sensory present moment, what we can see, hear, smell, touch and taste. And what that is, it's a way of focusing it. We're focusing our mind on the present moment. Then when we're here. So going back to the three cinema screens analogy. All right, so here we are. We've now managed to be aware that our mind is drawn into these other two cinema screens, the past and the future. And we've learned that it can be to our benefit to return it to now. So we returned to now, now what? Now we're left with all of the filtered version of our reality, all of the past and our experiences and our culture and how we perceive everything that affects everything. So what we need to then be able to do is to apply our mind in a why that helps us to become aware of the bias that we're applying to our experience.:
Speaker 1:
7:21
So let me give you an example. So let's say the, the screen of the present moment playing on that is a party. And in the party you come into the party and there are groups of people all chatting away. And what you want to do is, is figure out which group to join because you don't know anybody and you're a party animal. So you're not fast about who you speak to. What you do is you tune in on their conversations, notice what you're doing, you're focusing and you're listening. And one group, they're talking about Brexit and another group, they're talking about Trump and you don't want to go anywhere there. There's another group and they're having an uplifting conversation. So first you've identified it and now you're able to focus on it and you know is how you can be in a really busy place, cafe or a restaurant and there's the clinking of plates and there's music and people laughing and the waiters slamming doors as they walk in and out in order has been taken and it's all of this noise and you're able to tune in on the person that you're speaking to and tune out everything else from the perspective of meditation and mindfulness, that's the next thing that happens.:
Speaker 1:
8:45
We become aware of the present moment, but it still has all the baggage of our lifetime in it. And then what we want to be able to do is we want to find the elements of the present moment. The are real. By real. What I mean is there's this thing I call the hunter gatherer. A test. Get the hunter gatherer in and ask them about the ceiling and assuming they know our language, they'll say, well, there's a pattern and there's that's green and that's blue and their people and they look like some sort of animal and there are so there are flowers. What you've seen there is our common humanity, our common reality, everything else, the Grecian Wedgewood nature of the plaques. That's our culture that we're projecting on it and this focus consists of separating what we're adding to our present moment experience from what's actually their reality. The only reality there is is a common reality is the thing that we all look at and we all see that thing in it. Everything else is the products and the mind and it doesn't matter. It's neither good nor bad, but you need to know that it's happening because if you don't know that it's happening, you can't separate what's real from what isn't. What's common reality from what's my personal reality and all the conflict we experience is all about all these different realities. Somebody wants to ask me, do you believe in parallel universes? And I said, yeah. I said, there's a billion of them walking around right now.:
Speaker 1:
10:44
And so this, this is what focus is. We're focusing on the present moment, training ourselves to do it. We have to train the subconscious because the subconscious is in charge of our perception. It chooses what we perceive, what we notice and what we don't. Notice this thing called selective attention. Look it up. I'd go through this on the course and your your subconscious, which is the product of your experience and your culture is selecting what you perceive and your missing the rest. And that's a tragedy because that's where, that's where life is. This is where the beauty and joy of life is. It's in the present moment and it's in a lot of neutral experiences that we've been trained to dismiss. Neutral experiences aren't good enough. What we want is elevated experience is intense experiences and just buy my stuff and go to my coattail and you can have this, you see?:
Speaker 1:
11:46
And so the just the ordinary day to day experience has become diminished because of this. It's become discounted and there's a premium on elevated, pleasurable, comfortable experiences and the neutral experience has everything you could want in it. So the Dalai Lama says that happiness is going in fulfillment from neutral experiences and he knows what he's talking about because he's an expert. Okay, so now I have to teach you to do this. Having expounded on the nature of focus to things. Then the first is to train our subconscious to remind us that our mind's wandered to the past or the future or to some alternative reality. It doesn't matter which, and the way we do that is through mindfulness practice and mindfulness practice is officially hard. A read an article, you read a book, it's difficult. It's viewed as yet another willpower based goal oriented activity.:
Speaker 1:
12:51
Go do your 15 minutes a day. It has then has to compete with diet and exercise and work and career and social life and everything else. And it's not going to win. It's not going to win. What we need to do is find a soft and easy way into it. And that's what this is. So what I'm going to do is teach you a practice that many of you know the ICL for a lot of very good reasons and meditation of no meditation. Meditation's officially hard. That's okay. You don't have to worry because this isn't a meditation. Well, it is, but it also isn't, right? It's a meditation of no meditation. And the way to do it, you're probably better off closing your eyes, but you don't necessarily have to, you just don't want to be distracted by anything that you see. It's an exercise in listening. And so cast your mind to the furthest sound right on cue and airplane. So that's part of the dome of sound that's around you within which you can hear. And it's probably several miles away. So this dome of sound, which is all the sounds you can hear, which consists of traffic, airplanes, distant police, sirens, helicopters, whatever it might happen to be stretches for miles in each direction and you're in the center of it.:
Speaker 1:
14:34
And so notice yourself, notice yourself sitting here. Here I am, yeah, all around me. There is sound people talking in the park, they'll be dogs barking, that'd be birds calling.:
Speaker 2:
14:52
There's movements in the room, movements in the match and voices in the mansion from time to time, traffic, airplanes and the the mind tends to move like a search light from one thing to another, but what we want to do is allow it all in. It's like opening ourselves up to all the sound. We're not trying to get anything out of it. We're not trying to identify it. Decide what it is, listen to what people are saying, find out where it is, where it's going. We just allow it all into our experience and notice that you're at the center of it and it's all around you sound and that's what we do for awhile. Just noticing sound. If your mind gets drawn into a sound or drawn anywhere else, notice your sitting here is how it feels to be you being pushed into the chair and being at the center of all this sound, sound in every direction. Just allow you allow. It's all wash over you.:
Speaker 3:
16:45
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
16:47
So all we're doing is listening and do, you're not going to get anything out on this. This isn't mental training. There's no goal, there's no expectations. It's just sound. Just last name. So there's, we're not doing anything with it. We're not trying to achieve anything. The mind's busy. It doesn't matter if the mind wanders. It doesn't matter if the mind gets hooked on a particular sound, it doesn't matter.:
Speaker 3:
18:54
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
18:54
But just noticing that we're at the center of all of this sound and it's all around us. Well, listening to the hubbub of sound.:
Speaker 3:
19:18
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
19:35
And now we're going to move from noticing sounds to noticing movement.:
Speaker 3:
19:41
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
19:42
And the place to note the movement. It's just at the point where the belly mates, the chest,:
Speaker 3:
19:49
yeah.:
Speaker 2:
19:53
Right at the top of the ballet. And you'll notice in the movement of the ballet, if you can't feel anything, you just place your fingers there and you're noticing the belly rising and falling.:
Speaker 3:
20:29
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
20:30
And the same as with a meditation of no meditation for sound, meditation of no meditation for the breath because again, there's nothing to be had from it. No goal, no expectation. I'm not getting anything from it,:
Speaker 3:
20:57
okay?:
Speaker 2:
20:57
Just noticing that movement rising,:
Speaker 3:
21:01
fallen,:
Speaker 2:
21:30
just the movement, nothing else. It doesn't matter how busy the mind is, doesn't matter if it doesn't matter if you're noticing sounds, if you're comfortable or uncomfortable, tired or alert, nothing. Masters.:
Speaker 3:
21:45
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
21:46
Just noticing that movement.:
Speaker 3:
21:48
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
22:27
and now we do move into a meditation, but there's hardly any difference. What this meditation is is we're noticing the breath take, notice the breath by the movement of the belly if he want. Or you can notice the breath by the sense sensation of air entering and leaving the nostrils, whichever you find easiest to focus on. Notice how all of this is an exercise on the focus. So you can focus on the breath in the nostrils or you can notice the breath, the belly rising and falling. Or you can notice the breath anywhere else in the body. Shoulders move in the chest, rising and falling. Whatever's convenient.:
Speaker 3:
23:23
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
23:27
and here we've got one instruction. When the mind wanders, we come back and notice the breath. So I see exactly the same as the last exercise where we're just noticing the movement here. We could be noticing the movement or we can be noticing the sensation of the breath and law strolls. There's only one instruction. Whenever we notice the mind's wandered, we come back and notice the breath and it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter how many times the mind wanders. Doesn't matter how long for it doesn't matter how busy the mind is, if there's a constant, Yada, Yada. The inner critic comparing, judging, nothing matters. Oh, we're doing this. We're noticing the price rising on format. And then when our mind wanders, we notice that the mind's wandered. We come back to the breath and this is called following the breath. For those of you whose mind wanders a long way. Just as a little reminder, every so often:
Speaker 4:
25:52
I'll sound the bell.:
Speaker 2:
25:57
So if your mind is wandering along, why you'll notice the sound. Oh, you'll come back and notice the breath. Very simple, simple meditation. Noticing in the breath, mind wanders, return to the breath. Repeat.:
Speaker 3:
26:20
Okay. Okay.:
Speaker 1:
28:37
Breathing in, noticing whatever it is you can smell, you can taste. Did he know ferry on time? They were turning your attention to the room. Those two first practices, meditation of no meditation for sound and the meditation of no meditation for the Braf. They both meditations and not meditations. There are kind of bridge between meditation and mindfulness. So the meditation of no meditation for sound is the most useful because it's frictionless. 97 98% of people find that a frictionless experience. And somebody tells you that meditation was hard.:
Speaker 3:
29:34
Yeah,:
Speaker 1:
29:35
and the way it's always been taught and the way I used to teach it, it can become a competition with the mind to do this thing because I know it's good for me, so it becomes a push. But with these practices, it can become a poll. In January I'll be teaching a mint, another mini series called eight steps to mastering meditation and that will be held here. Just I'll teach it during the class is like I'm teaching this mini series and it explained the whole thing, what it works, what it does, how it works, and of course you'll learn that if you come on the courses, but this is a practice you can do anywhere. It doesn't matter what you're doing, you should, you're driving along and you're aware of all sound. It's more useful to be aware of all sounds. You're walking along the road, you're aware of all sound.:
Speaker 1:
30:35
You're not replacing your experience with something, and this is what's happening when we do the last practice, the following, the breath practice, where if placing our common experience of mind wandering and thoughts and doing things with noticing the breath, mind wandering, coming back to the breath again. So it's a genuine training. We're training our subconscious to become aware that our mind's wandered. And to that end, it's critical to developing mindfulness, but it can be unsatisfactory because the mind creates a competition which says, I must be present and noticing the breath. Nobody's ever told you this, but your mind does it on its own because this is how the modern mind works. And then when you find your mind's wandering the law, you conclude the, actually this is rubbish. I'm no good at good at it. And you give up. And that's what happens to most people who start meditating or they find another meditation that's noisy enough in their heads that they can do.:
Speaker 1:
31:43
And so the following the breath doesn't get adopted as a sustainable practice by most meditators. So the way into it is through the meditation of no meditation. So you can do that anywhere and you will all have experienced a particular sort of calmness when you were doing it and unusual calmness. It part of our legacy, it's part of our humanity. We all have this capacity to be here now without an unhelpful, repetitive train of thoughts. Drawing our attention from the present moment. We've all got that capacity, but it's been trained out of us by our culture and be by our society and media in the lives. And what we're doing is unlearning the unhelpful things that we've learned. But the problem is if it takes decades to learn them, it takes years to unlearn them. But you will see progress and the progress you look for the progress in your life, not in the practices.:
Speaker 1:
32:50
Cause y'all have a good meditation day, you'll have a bad meditation day. I have weeks where you don't meditate. I'll have weeks when you met his hate a lot. He might have a whole day of meditation. This is how it is. I it doesn't matter. Yeah. And we, what we are happens is we, oh, I'm not doing my 15 minutes, therefore I give up. Yeah. That's what I was taught what I taught for a while to be honest. But it's more about you finding that presence in your experience and then it pulls you into the meditations. And I'll explain more of this over the course of the next couple of months. Right. So that's the what the following the breath meditation does. We're repeating the experience of noticing the mind's wandered, which is a thing called the moment of recognition. The more we notice that the more we become aware that our mind has wandered and by becoming aware that our mind's wandered, we're back here. Then we get to choose. Then what?:
Speaker 1:
33:52
What we may need to be able to do is to be able to choose which elements of our experience we become aware of to focus in on those things that are helpful for our happiness or not. Those things are unhelpful for our happiness and you will know what they are. So what I'll do is I'll teach you a meditation which is an introduction to the present moment. For those of you that haven't experienced it yet, and it's what I call the presence meditation. A little bit of posture advice to meditate. It's more useful if you place your feet flat on the floor. Comfort's important. If you place your elbows by your side, you'll notice that your spine naturally straightens up. And the next thing to do is to find the most comfortable place for your skull to be balanced on top of your spine. So feet on the floor. Comfort first. Obviously if you've got a bad back or something, you sit however you need to sit to be comfortable. But without that feet on the floor, elbows by the side, skull balanced comfortably as possible on top of the spine. The point of maximum comfort. That's what you're looking for.:
Speaker 1:
35:26
Can we begin by noticing the breath? If you place your tongue gently up against the back of your top teeth, you'll notice the breath entering and leaving the nostrils.:
Speaker 2:
35:49
And we'll begin by noticing the invisible energy. Let's connecting us to the planet, which is what we call the force of gravity. Notice it pushing you down into the chair, pushing your feet into the floor, pulling your shoulders down, and if your head's tipped forward, it will pull it forward further. So you go spend your entire life fighting gravity with a small muscles at the back of your neck. Hence the posture and notice your sense of balance, which is another way that we interact with gravity by balancing balancing I body, balancing our head and notice all of the internal senses. Oh, you warm or cool, which part of you is warm and which part of you is cool? Are you comfortable or uncomfortable? Where's the discomfort and why is the most comfortable part? Are you tired or alert? Oh, you tense or relaxed? No, it's the tension.:
Speaker 3:
37:29
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
37:29
Breathing in, normally, breathing out. Just let it go. Release it. Just let it out of your body, out of your shoulders, out of your face. Notice whatever it is you can smell, what you can taste, what you couldn't hear. And even with the eyes closed, what you can see sometimes there are colors and shapes and shadows and even movements:
Speaker 3:
38:18
from the blood:
Speaker 2:
38:20
flowing through the vessels in the islands and the allies. And what can you feel? What your hands in contact with? Notice you can feel:
Speaker 3:
38:36
how your hand feels. How does my hand feel? Is it warm or cool? Is there tingling? Can I feel the blood flowing?:
Speaker 2:
38:47
Uh, no. Is you can feel whatever it is that the hands feeling. So it fits in contact with the fabric of your clothing. You're feeling the texture. So am part of the body different focus and notice whatever thoughts are arising. What's the next thought? Gonna be White Forum. Notice what ever the next thoughts going to be. What's it been on pain? No, it's whatever emotions there are, whatever the backdrop of the day or the week or the month or the year has been. However your body communicates with you emotionally, whatever feelings that you sense, you might be able to interpretate. You might be able to say all this is anxiety or this happiness or this is joy, this is irritation or whatever it happens to be or you might not know,:
Speaker 3:
39:57
doesn't matter.:
Speaker 2:
40:02
And notice you're aware of where you are in the room. You're aware of the spice above you until either side of you and behind you and in front of you.:
Speaker 3:
40:17
Okay?:
Speaker 2:
40:18
And notice that what you can here helps to locate you so you know where you are in the room. You know where the door is, where the windows are. And if it went suddenly dark and you couldn't see, you needed to find your way to the door. Hello sounds around you, you would use them to help you locate yourself and notice that you're aware of where your body is, how you're seated. If you were to move your arm up in front of your eyes, you'd know when it got to eye level and when it was above your head. It's another sentence. It's called proprioception. And the awareness of where we are in a spice is cold, vistibular awareness. And these are all senses. Notice your breath. Notice that the body knows how deeply to breathe. It's sensing your need for oxygen and it's regulate in the breath to ensure that you get enough without expending extra energy, by breathing too much. It's regulate in the amount of co two and oxygen in your blood. That's doing it all on this little lonesome. And so we've got this banquet of sensory present moment experiences, a breath, what we can hear, the direction of what we can hear, what we can smell, feelings in our body, how our hand feels, what our hand is feeling, what thoughts are arising,:
Speaker 2:
42:35
like listening to the thoughts, our emotions.:
Speaker 3:
42:41
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
42:41
Tastes, balance, comfort, warmth. There was an almost infinite stream of sensory present moment experiences. This lot was what we call the grounding. So to the presence meditation, all we do is allow the mind to go wherever it wants to any of those experiences, balance, smell, thoughts, taste, warmth, sense of where we are in the room, sense of the people being around us at breath, what we can smell on, so on and so on and so on. And just let it wander like a kitten.:
Speaker 3:
43:42
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
43:43
What's been introduced to a new room? A Moose around sniffing everything.:
Speaker 3:
43:51
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
43:52
Allow your mandate, your mind to wander through your sensory present moment experience. And if it gets bombed down, cooling breath, warm out, breath, relaxing. As you breathe out, notice the sense of you sitting, the feeling of being pushed into the ground and allow the mind to wander through your sensory present moment again. Whenever it gets bogged down. Return to the breath. Call him breath cleansing, breath, relaxing out breath. Notice the sensation of setting. Just let the mind wander. Repeat, practice this for the next few minutes. It's called the presence meditation. If the mind becomes busy, no tissue can be aware of it. You can listen to it. You're witnessing, you're in the dialogue in the same way you're listening to all sounds. You're aware of what you can smell, what you taste, what you can here and uh, the inner dialogue, the thoughts, the images, the sound of your voice in your head. It's all just part of this. Just part of the present moment is drifting into your awareness, drifting out of it, and you can refocus. You can move your attention to something else. No, how relaxed you are or how tired you are or what you can smell, what you can feel or what you can here or way you are in the room on how your hand feels or whatever it might happen that they:
Speaker 1:
47:46
now just let your mind go free.:
Speaker 3:
47:53
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
47:54
Do whatever he wants. Notice all sound frame of mind. No instructions at the central sound.:
Speaker 3:
48:37
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
48:43
Or even in noticing what you can smell and taste sensation of it.:
Speaker 2:
48:48
Be off based on the floor, gently, annual, very on time. Or turn your attention to your surroundings.:
Speaker 1:
49:08
So now you, you might understand the analogy that I used a little bit better. The person sitting in the cinema noticing the stories on the screens and one of them, one of the stories is that, and the fact they're all in here, really, you know, we don't actually physically see each other. We see a representation that's constructed in our brains of our experience. It's like a mirror. It reflects the information that comes in through our senses and it reconstructs it and that, and that's what we're looking at. And there's an awareness that's aware of this. But no, it's that awareness can be tiny. It can be drawn into a single thing, like an irritating sound or a discomfort. So it's in little point or it can be huge and it can let in everything, all of your present moment experience and these practices. And when you're having the meditation light, the presence, meditation, it doesn't matter what happens internally. If your minds are having a busy day and you're just sitting there listening to it, lecturing you about what you should and shouldn't do. So Ryan, notice that you can do that.:
Speaker 1:
50:31
That takes away a lot of the power of it. It's not me, it's my subconscious. What's the next thing you're gonna think? You don't know? That's your subconscious to rising and your experience along with all of the emotions and all of the senses, and the dogs barking in the park and the birds and the smells and the noises out in the building and the sound of my voice just arises in our experience and were able to watch it. That's what the focus is. So the focus can be tight or it can be open. All we're doing is we are training the muscles, the enable us to to lift the weights of the present moment so we can move our attention and our focus to what is best for us rather than something that's unhelpful for us. We, we need to be able to soften the present moment because it can be an unsatisfactory place is it takes a while to to be able to refocus our attention on something once when something's compellingly unhelpful for us.:
Speaker 1:
51:49
So to soften it as an incredibly powerful practice. For some people, this is the most powerful practice there is. The Buddhists have developed this practice known as Metta above. No, I'm not religious. I'm an agnostic. I don't know, an uncomfortable not knowing, but this is a wonderful thing and what it is, it's a set set of practices that operate on our more comfortable and warm or emotions and I help help everywhere. So they helped with the uncomfortable emotions. I helped with an unhelpful sense of self, which is a very, very common thing because of the craziness, craziness of the world. We tend to find a lot of fault with ourselves. And this really helps to unravel that. And so what a teacher is a thing called the self compassion meditation. It's very simple. It's a breathing exercise. So if you want to get yourselves comfortable and begin by noticing the breath ideally. So comfort first, but ideally elbows by the side, feet flat on the floor, skull balanced as comfortably as possible on top of your spine. You can close your eyes or you can look down at the floor. Pass the tip of your nose with your eyes half shut so you don't get distracted by anything that's going on around you. And you're noticing the breath rising and falling.:
Speaker 2:
53:32
Ron is saying full name on, on the out breath. You place your tongue gently up against the back of your teeth just so you can feel the sharp part of the teeth. Relaxing on the out breath, relaxing your face, your shoulders, like a wave of relaxation, moving down your body on every out breath. And then we have a mantra and that's just something we say in our minds while we met at site. Breathing in normally breathing out, we say in our mind on the first outbreath may I be well second outbreath, may I be happy so it out breath. May I find peace of mind,:
Speaker 3:
54:33
my IP? Well,:
Speaker 2:
54:39
my IB be happy. Well, I find peace of mind first. This is just words and time. It brings a calmness emotion with it. A warm feeling. My Ib. Well, may I be happy my I find peace of mind.:
Speaker 3:
55:20
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
56:17
and I can and noticing the sensation of sitting:
Speaker 1:
56:25
and whenever you're ready, return your attention to your surroundings.:
Speaker 1:
56:31
That's another element of the present moment. What we want to be able to do is to soften it and make it a pleasurable experience. Because most of our experience, 99% of our life is neutral experiences. It gets polluted and contaminated by the mind, which has been trained by our past and our culture to look for hostility, look for competition, look for problems, solve them, solve them. Now think about it compulsively until you can find a solution. And that takes us to an unhelpful what place and what we want to be able to do is to get back the neutrality of the present moment, and then with the gratitude practices, the metal bar off now, things like the compassion meditation, what we're doing is rebalancing our present moment experience, get back to the present moment, then rebalance it, and I'm free of the pollution and the contamination that you experienced that makes the unsatisfactory. Okay, so that's it for focus.:
×

Listen to this podcast on