More than just mindfulness

Sleep

November 28, 2018 Season 1 Episode 14
More than just mindfulness
Sleep
Chapters
More than just mindfulness
Sleep
Nov 28, 2018 Season 1 Episode 14
Robert Mitchell
Abut sleep and meditation and meditations taught specifically for sleep
Show Notes Transcript

Session 9 of the ‘modern life’ mini-series is on sleep.
Most of us are sleep deprived at least some of the time.
80% of our #mindfulness course participants sleep better.
Listen to this podcast to hear how meditation practices can help you get to sleep or get back to sleep if you wake up at night.
Meditations: The meditation of no meditation for the breath at 19 minutes, following the breath at 21:30, noting the breath at 28:30, counting the breaths at 33:00, four tens meditation for sleep at 43:00




Speaker 1:
0:02
So today's session is on sleep. There's a a thing that I often do, all sorts of organizations. It doesn't matter actually. I'll sometimes do it in my courses as well and I get people to put their hands up if they have trouble getting to sleep and then I'll get them to put their hands up if they have trouble getting back to sleep when they wake up at night and then I'll get them to put their hands up if they sleep six and a half hours or less. And by then we've got pretty much everybody with their hands in the air.:
Speaker 1:
0:41
That's because we're sleep deprived and the reason that we're sleep deprived is because it's, it doesn't align with our genetic design. The way we sleep. There's a book by a guy called Daniel Everett, it's called don't sleep. There are snakes. He spent decades living with the pair are hard. People in the Amazon piece says the pure Aha sleep whenever they're tired, the village can be as busy at two o'clock in the morning as it can be at two o'clock in the afternoon. And when they sleep, they sleep for about 90 minutes or two hours. And if you look at the humans sleep cycle, it's 90 minutes or two hours. Another piece of evidence is that the 16 hours awake and our reflexes begin to suffer, which is the best easily measured physiological insight into sleep deprivation. The reason we sleep overnight is very simply to align with our economy.:
Speaker 1:
1:58
Nothing more than that. No human beings slept for eight hours until really the last hundred hundred and 50 years. And if you look at the night's sleep, you'll see these sleep cycles in. So I've got a, an APP that measures my sleep. I've been using it since March, 2017 it's gathered statistics on my sleep ever since. So I have a lot of insight into my sleep. So what happens is we have these sleep cycles and we wake up. So when the researchers first started researching into sleep, they would bring people into the lab and they would hook them up and put a video camera on and then people go off to sleep and they wake up during the night, look around themselves and go back to sleep again. But when they were asked by the researchers if they were aware they had woken up, most of them weren't aware.:
Speaker 1:
2:59
All wake up in the night whether we think we do or not. So I can have what seems like a good solid nights sleep. And when I look at my hypno Graham, which is output of the measurement device that measures my sleep, it tells me on my have woken up to three times in the night. Sometimes I wear a bit, sometimes I'm not. The problem is we're designed to sleep when we're tired. Ideally we wouldn't really be awake for more than eight hours and we'd have a little nap. If you look around the world, once you get away from the global economy where everybody's entire day is taken up for a large part of their week by work, and even even if it is, if it's agricultural labor or something like that, you'll find throughout the world, Siesta is a really the name of the game. Only a few years ago I went to Granada, we were going down the main road, which it was like Oxford Street on a busy day, nothing was moving, the bus wasn't moving.:
Speaker 1:
4:10
So we got off and walked. It was crowds of people went into the Alhambra came out a couple of hours later, looked around. There wasn't a single soul on the street, just us, no cars, one cafe open for the tourists. That was it. Siesta. It's natural to not cram all of your sleep into one session. So there's consequences to this and the consequences of sleep deprivation. And one of the problems with sleep deprivation is it habituates. So you get used to it. Their study that they did was on college graduates and they deprive them of sleep. So I slept in the sleep lab and they weren't allowed to sleep for more than six hours a night. And so they felt tired for the first couple of weeks and they felt less tired and less tired. And say, if you ask people subjectively how tired they are, it is not a useful indication of whether they are sleep deprived or not.:
Speaker 1:
5:14
What's more useful is mood, especially when you wake up in the morning. So unfortunately this becomes part of our stress cycle. In the modern world, there can be all sorts of threats, financial insecurities, the biggest one that most people deal with and it makes a really significant difference to how people feel about themselves. And financial insecurity can come to anybody. It doesn't matter how much money you got, clearly if you have very little money in more likely, so experience financial insecurity and then there's the security of your relationships, your family, our and our economy tends to fragment as society. People have to move away for work. They have to move away for college and university and that that comes a global thing now because people, a lot of young people go and move overseas to be within a new spouse or vice versa. And then there's also economic factors.:
Speaker 1:
6:22
Those traditional industries die, I suppose is the best way to put it. People move away from those areas. There's more competition for property. People get priced out of barriers, they have to move on. It just is continuous. It creates a perception of being separated and isolated and then of course, how how you perceive yourself in relation to your peers and your job and how you feel your you're viewed by your employer and so on and so on. And so on. Threats, threats, threats, threats. What happens is this creates a cycle of stress, which is the physiological response, anxiety, which is how you feel about it and worry, which is what the mind does to try and make sense of the whole thing. And then of course there's another, this other element which is sleep. People can't sleep because they've got a busy mind usually. But it, in my view, is probably a combination of those things.:
Speaker 1:
7:28
It's anxiety, stress, and busy mind. Stress, chemicals keep you alert, so that's the problem, how to solve it. What I teach effectively is a number of different interventions. The mindfulness meditation exercises, we're intervening in a whole load of things, probably too many to go into right now. That's quite a long road, but there are benefits all the way along it. While you continue with a regular mindfulness meditation practice, something like following the breath, more and more things will slot in place for your happiness. The other interventions or stress management and emotional regulation techniques, purpose of all of this is to intervene in that negative feedback loop, stress, anxiety, worry, and we'll add sleep deprivation into it. Stress, anxiety, worry, sleep deprivation and stress. It why? Once you add sleep deprivation, you've got all sorts of secondary issues, so the interventions for stress management and the interventions for emotional regulation are reasonably simple and you can use them to bring your physiology backend to align and to manage your emotional state regulated.:
Speaker 1:
9:04
But we can also use all of these techniques. Really the meditations, the stress management techniques, the emotional regulation techniques, we can use them all to intervene in difficult sleep and encouraged sleep and assist us to sleep. It's just a matter of what to use. And when. When I started meditating, which was in 1988 I believe really retained only one practice that I did regularly, which is a thing called counting the breath meditation. It's the meditation that works for most people when they first start meditating to help them calm their minds. I would do it if my mind was going into overdrive while I was trying to get to sleep. Now it doesn't work for everyone and only 45% of people find it useful so that there are a bundle of other techniques that we can use.:
Speaker 1:
10:09
Counting the breaths is the numero uno option and then there's some other meditations and some other practices and I'll teach those today of all of the things that people benefit from when they do a mindfulness course, they do one of my courses anyway, cause I only measure my courses is that 80% of people sleep patter. So that's a universal benefit and that they do that because they've managed to alleviate their stress. Stress, chemicals keep you alert if your stress reduces you sleep pattern. It's a knock on effect. And so for instance, in this class where people lie down, most sessions somebody's asleep and sometimes more than one of you. So by the end of the day, I expect you all to be asleep.:
Speaker 1:
11:14
Meditations, the only thing you can teach where if everybody falls asleep, you know you're doing a good job. If you've ever wondered why people sit cross legged to meditate, that's the only reason is to stop. You're going to sleep. And the zen meditation people, they tuck their legs underneath there bumps, so they sit in on their ankles. Yeah, that's definitely stops you going to sleep. That's what I'll be teaching. But we'll start off. If I had to give you some tips to help you get to sleep, there would be think just things that you can do to help you sleep. You know, right now, without doing any other practices, the first one would be setting yourself an alarm to go to bed. Set yourself an alarm to get up in the morning, set yourself an alarm to go to bed at night and then set yourself an alarm to prepare to go to bed.:
Speaker 1:
12:19
Yeah, and you've set that about an hour, hour and a half before you go to bed. When you set yourself the prepare to go to bed alarm, prepare to go to bed. I put my dressing gown, the gown on, and again, clean my teeth. I do it an hour and a half before I go to bed for one very good reason that I cleaned my teeth then is because I'm going into the most brightly lit room in the house. And that's telling my brain it's morning. Yeah, very, very simply. We know that this has an effect. Modern devices like apple iPhone, they've got a thing called night shift and you see it and set night shift to come on every night at 10 o'clock and you can set the warmth. It's got a warm glow, so it moves from white to warm.:
Speaker 1:
13:12
I tend to read before I go to bed. So I'll, I'll, I'll read on kindle, but I'll use the night shift functionality and your mom, you'll find that on a lot of phones now. Something similar. So that's the thing, the bet. The first thing is an alarm to go to bed, an alarm to prepare for bed. The other thing you can do is get cooler. We sleep better at 19 degrees. The APP that I use a thing called sleep cycle. It gives you the average sleep quality throughout the world. And the worst sleep quality is always in the Middle East. And the best sleep quality is always in Scandinavia. And that's very simply because if you're too cold, you can warm yourself up in a Jiffy. You just pulled the blanket up, right? It takes a lot longer to get cool. And the part of you that needs to be cool is your body, not your hands and feet. 19 degrees is the ideal temperature. So if you've got an accurate thermometer, uh, in your, in your house and it know, put it in your room and adjust your hating so that it's either 19 degrees or below and below is fine because you can keep your body warm just by having to do via or a blanket. So step number one, set an alarm to go to slate. Step number two, stay cool.:
Speaker 1:
14:53
And so step number three is a very, very simple thing. If you take your thumbs and fingers and you just your first finger, touch your thumb with your first finger. This is the, the typical yoga teachers meditation pose. And that's a thing called the Chin Madura. If you do that at night when you want to go to sleep and all you do is if you forget about it and you know your hand, your fingers are no longer in contact, put them back in contact again, just touching the finger and thumb together. Like that transforms sleep for about one in 10 people. That's it. That's all you do. Finger and thumb, incontact, Chin Majora. It doesn't have to be tight just so they're touching. If they stopped touching in your notice, put them together at some little sleep tips. What I do now is I'll teach meditations or all of these meditations, meditations that you can use a sleep interventions. So what we'll do is we'll start off with the counting the breaths meditation. Um, so it's kind of 50, 50 for this. The meditations that I've learned that helps her calm people's minds are either counting the breaths or labeling the thoughts. If you prefer labeling the thoughts, label the thoughts you prefer, counting the breaths, following along with us. Count breaths. I don't, we're in a day is a few minutes account in the breath:
Speaker 1:
16:34
for nearly half of the population or the people that that try meditation and stick with it for any period of time. This is the meditation that helps to calm the mind the most and that has an effect and that feeds into your stress and your anxiety. But more than anything else, it, it will calm the mind. So what I do is I'll teach you the, I'm counting the breath meditation. You can and you're in bed, you can relax. Yeah. So you can check in with your face, your shoulders, relaxing on a few out breaths. Letting the tension and tightness out is a useful thing. It's a good thing. And so counting the breaths is, is a meditation of noticing the breath. So it's not much different the following the brands, the relation ship. So the breath is the same where observing the breath, we're noticing it, witnessing it like somebody who's sitting on the beach, noticing the waves rolling out,:
Speaker 2:
17:50
washing the Y, rolling up, washing the wine.:
Speaker 3:
17:54
Okay,:
Speaker 2:
17:55
so we're not concentrating on the waves were not deeply focused on the way. So just noticing them happen. And then the same way you notice the way it was happening, you notice in the Braf happening, noticing the breath, rising notes in the breath fall. So what we'll do is we'll start off by following the breath because we want to build the correct relationship to the breath.:
Speaker 3:
18:24
Okay?:
Speaker 2:
18:25
Then what we'll do is we'll add a little mantra to notice in the breath, which is all a mantra. Is, is something we say in our mind when we're meditating. And then we'll move into counting. The breaths is good to when you do counts in the breast. To start off by noticing the breath and doing a little bit of following the breath first. So if you get yourselves comfortable, begin by following the breath and what we'll do, we'll actually make it even more.:
Speaker 3:
19:08
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
19:09
Frictionless by starting with a meditation of no meditation for the breath and the meditation of no meditation for the breath is just noticing the movement of the ballet at the top of the ballet. Tiny little movement. That's the belly rising and falling in times of the breath, we're just noticing that there's no instructions. It doesn't matter if your mind wanders. It doesn't matter if your mind's busy, nothing matters. It doesn't matter how you feel.:
Speaker 3:
19:49
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
19:50
What you're doing is noticing this movement belly rising belly full name.:
Speaker 3:
20:17
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
20:26
let just aware of the movement. Nothing else:
Speaker 3:
20:51
[inaudible]:
Speaker 2:
21:04
just that tiny little movement. No instructions, no expectations. Don't get anything out of this. It's not even a meditation.:
Speaker 3:
21:41
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
21:52
Okay. So what we're going to do now is move into following the breath. So following the breath has an instruction in. It's only one thing. So the only difference between the friction, this practice, we were doing, the meditation of no meditation for the breath and following the breath is that following the breath has an instruction and the instruction is that when you notice your mind's wandered, he bring your attention back to the breath. You can notice the breath anyway you want. You can notice the movement of the belly still. Well, you can notice the coolness of the in breath and the warmth of the outbreak. Simplest meditation in the world, but one the 95% of people can't fit into their day consists of four lines in the script. Notice the breath, the mind wanders, return your attention to the breath. Unrepeat we'll just practice this for the next few minutes. I ancient technique, it's called following the breath. I was noticing the breath rising and the breath full lane, the sensation of the breath. Cool miss of the in breath and the warmth of the outbreath. Whenever you notice that you're not aware of the breath, you just come back and notice the breath.:
Speaker 3:
25:37
Yeah.:
Speaker 2:
26:01
All this is is an exercise in focus. Focus is what our awareness is resting on. So our awareness is resting on the breath, we're noticing it, and then our awareness is drawn into the constructs of the mind. Cold thought could be the end, a voice or a dialogue or images or memories or scenarios or outcomes or planning or tasks or priorities or, and the guy was on and on and on and on and on. We become consumed by that. At some point we notice and then we return our focus to the breath. That's all it is. It's a general pendulum and process. Noticing the breath, mind wanders back to the breath, mind wanders back to the breath and repeat and mind wanders a thousand times a patient. They compassionately, it's fine. Your attention to the breath a thousand times. And now we'll add a mantra to it to make it a little bit easy, easier on the mantra. All we're doing is labeling when noting the in breath and when noticing the out breath, using the mind, using the inner dialogue.:
Speaker 3:
28:51
Okay?:
Speaker 2:
28:53
And so what we do is when we're breathing in [inaudible] mind rising and when we're breathing out, when we say on our mine falling, rising, falling, why not pausing our breath to happen in time to the mantra? Well, what Damon is noticing the breath and repeating the mantra in time to the breath.:
Speaker 2:
29:44
Awesome. While we're doing this, we're noticing that thoughts arise. We're notes in the ebb and flow of thoughts in the mind, the wandering, the arising of thought, the subsiding of thought, the moment of recognition. When we notice that we become part of our thought, returning to the breath, noticing the mantra, power of thought again. Sometimes you'll find it or it will draw you into this semi sleep where it's almost a dream. That's the hit and Goget state. If that happens, what you do is stay there. Don't force yourself away. Don't drift off. So your weight where one one foot in the white king world and one foot in the slate wild. It's comfortable. Semi sleep state.:
Speaker 2:
33:09
Oh dear. Now he's coming to counting the breaths. Suffolk counting the breaths. It's the same process of noticing the breath rising and falling. And what we did is we just count each successive breath. We can't one on the in breath to when the outbreath three on the in breath, four on the outbreath up to 10 when we get to 10 begin at one again, when we lose count begin at one again. So that's one on the in breath to when the outbreath three on the in breath for on the outbreath up to 10 get to 10 start at one lose count, start at one so that it's counting from one to 10 coming back to one when we finished or start in at one again, if we lose count. So just practice his counting the breaths for the next few minutes.:
Speaker 3:
35:12
Okay,:
Speaker 2:
36:53
so noticing the rhythm of the breath. Notice it in your nostrils, specially the coolness and sharpness of the in breath. No, it's what you can smell. I'm what you can taste. No, it's I have is around here. Whatever you can hear. Collection of all sounds, the hubbub of the present moment. I see yourself becoming aware of that and the sensation of being pushed into the ground. A feeling of contacts is gravity's doing its thing and then your very own time when ever you're ready Jen, attention to your surroundings, wiggling your fingers and toes a little bit.:
Speaker 3:
38:17
Okay,:
Speaker 2:
38:21
so I'll kind of intervened in that:
Speaker 3:
38:23
[inaudible]:
Speaker 2:
38:24
well you could do, we could have carried on into some other relaxation meditations,:
Speaker 3:
38:29
but:
Speaker 2:
38:30
I want to kind of bring you back before we do that:
Speaker 1:
38:34
because they, the information of when to use these or is as useful as actually using them. So the counting the breath meditation is the easiest to implement as something to assist you getting to sleep. It doesn't work so well. If you wake up in the night and you want to get back to sleep again.:
Speaker 3:
39:02
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
39:04
To gas hell was back to sleep again. We want to intervene with the body because if we've woken up and the body wants to wake up or it thinks it's time to wake up, um, or it feels like you need to wake up, it actually start releasing stress. Chemical called courts is I'll, there's a cortisol spike, which is actually quite significant. It's a 10 times the amount of cortisol in your body over the rest of the day, uh, in a normal, healthy human. So what we want to do is intervene in that and we do that at a physiological level.:
Speaker 3:
39:46
Okay.:
Speaker 1:
39:46
So there you are. You've managed to get to sleep. Count in the brass says calm the mind or whatever practice you use, you might use labeling the thoughts it might use following the breath. He might just label the breath rising and falling, whatever it happens to be. You've managed to get to sleep and you want to wake up, you have to practice all these, try them out, see what works for you. And there you are. If woken up at night, you want to get back to sleep again. So what we want to do is to not try to get back to sleep.:
Speaker 3:
40:26
Yeah.:
Speaker 1:
40:26
It is. The mind works against us almost universally in this way. So what happens is people wake up and they try and get back to sleep. It's just like trying to get to sleep. Um, and you, you're making it more of a thing, it becomes a big deal then. I mean, it may or may not be a big deal, but you're confirming to your mind it's a big deal. So the first story in Genesis,:
Speaker 1:
40:57
I'm not a Christian, but this is a genius piece of wisdom. So God says you need anything you want in this garden of Eden, but don't touch that fruit, right? What that is, is that's our natural human tendency to elevate something that's naughty or bad or we shouldn't have. So all of a sudden it becomes the juiciest fruit in the garden just because you've been told not to eat it. So we've elevated it as an element of our experience. Elevate something is an element of your experience and there's a lot of emotion becomes attached to it straight away. And it becomes what I call a thing. So you know, I must get back to sleep, must get back to sleep. Is, is the recipe for not getting to sleep. So what you say to yourself is this, I'm not going to sleep. I'm going to meditate because, and you will learn this actually, the in the middle of the night, half an hour, an hour's meditation is at least as good as half an hour or an hour sleep without slices.:
Speaker 1:
42:05
Shadow of a doubt. Even if you only got a little while to wake up, you know, let's say you set your alarm for seven and it's five 30 and you're awake and you're aware that you're sleep deprived so you, you, you don't feel like springing out of bed to greet the brand new day. Your mind's not going to let you get back to sleep. You're going to struggle and get a full sleep cycle in any way unless you just happen to go to sleep straight away. So what you do is you say it yourself, okay, then I'm not going to sleep. I'll do instead is I'll meditate on this is the meditation that you do and I'll give you a couple of little tips to help you to use it in a specific way that will help you to relax even more then you will. Anyway, it's called the four 10. This meditation, we'll add one extra element. Well two extra elements, but one that we don't normally add because where I live in a busy world, busy mind, busy world, modern mind, lots of priorities, lots of tasks, a lot of problems. What are the things to do? A lot of threats, lot of stress.:
Speaker 1:
43:46
Our physiology is, is responded and the way it's responded is, is by adding muscular skeletal tension. What tense Arielle eyebrows are furrowed. We're squinting like writing. I'd say faith, we can't sit still. My shoulders are hunched forward. A posture is not useful. We're not setting up, our elbows aren't by our side. We're leaning forward as we walk, um, staring into our mobile phone. We're trying to avoid the present moment because it's unsatisfactory because of the, the deluge of things to do, places to go. People will see:
Speaker 2:
44:32
that that's the seemingly infinite, whatever it might happen to be, whatever it might happen to be. And it, it, it manifests itself intention. So there's a couple of things that we can do straight off before we start meditating and so resolve our attention. It's useful to have your elbows by your side, whether your lying down or sitting. That helps. And then if you place your tongue against the sharp part of your teeth just enough so that you're aware of the sharpness of your teeth, that's all you need is to be aware of the sharpness of your team and you're noticing the breath rising and falling. Just noticing the breath. Just noticing the sharpness of the Tafe and then you place your thumb and forefinger together. No, you're going to do is throw out the session and assuming you're trying to get some sleep, just keep them in contact. If you find that they're no longer in contact, he put them back in contact. Again, you're noticing the breath rising. It's in the breath. Full line. No, no. Same. The sharpness of the teeth. You're noticing your elbows are by the side. You know it's your finger and the thumb. First Finger and thumb is in contacts.:
Speaker 2:
46:35
Allow yourself to become aware of the area around your eyes. You know, you might have to raise your eyebrows or squint,:
Speaker 3:
46:47
oh,:
Speaker 2:
46:50
frown fro the awhile. Something to help you to connect your eyes. You might want to start with a forehead, in which case you place your palm very, very close to your forehead without actually touching it. And then you're focusing your sensation. You're focusing your awareness on the sensations which are quite complex as a tingling of the tiny hairs on the forehead. How's their touch by the palm and the warmth of the poem. Elbows still by the side, noticing the time against the sharp part of the tafe finger and thumb, incontact. And then slowly for up to 10 out breath when you count in your mind.:
Speaker 3:
47:57
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
47:58
you're relaxing. The eyebrows, the eyes and cheeks, incremental relaxation. Just letting a tiny little bit more tension out of your eyes, your eyebrows and your cheeks. Little bit more on each out breath and just count the out breaths. It's a 10 and so again, checking in on all these parts of the body, checking your tongue is in concert with the sharp part of your teeth. Your elbows are but your side, your thumb and first finger or are in contact. Uh, noticing the relaxation as you breathe out. Oh, your mouth and lips, your jaw on your throat. The same is with the eyes, with the jaw relaxing on 10 outbreaks, counting the out breath in your mind as you breathe out. This is like in a way, it's not counseling the price. See Accountant 10 out. Press for the eyes. 10 out. Press for the jaw.:
Speaker 3:
50:40
Okay,:
Speaker 2:
50:41
we're going to do the shoulders and the hands in a moment when you're doing this as an EIT to slate. If you lose count, just start with the eyes again. You get to the end. Just start with your eyes. So what you're doing is your account in 10 out breaths for the allies. Relaxing now is 10 breaths. The Jill, 10 out press of the shelters. 10 outbreath for the hands.:
Speaker 3:
51:07
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
51:07
And in between, you know, checking in.:
Speaker 3:
51:10
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
51:10
Checking your elbows by the side. Tommy and colon site with a sharp Paul, the Tafe:
Speaker 3:
51:19
and you'll:
Speaker 2:
51:20
first finger and thumb are in contact.:
Speaker 3:
51:24
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
51:25
And then relax your shot back and sides of your neck and your shoulders on the out breath for 10 consecutive about price.:
Speaker 3:
52:31
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
52:44
And I'm breathing in. Normally a notice saying however is your hands feel, finger and thumb in contact. And what we're going to do is relax the hands. Alibaba is by the side tongue still in contact with the sharp part of the teeth. Breathing in, breathing out, relaxing the hands. Just saying it's tiny. Little bit of tension and pressure.:
Speaker 3:
53:18
Yeah,:
Speaker 2:
53:18
tiredness and stress out of your hands on each hour, right?:
Speaker 3:
53:23
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
53:24
Just keeping the four finger and thumb:
Speaker 1:
53:26
in contact on again, 10 out breaths on the hands, hounding them in your mind.:
Speaker 1:
54:25
And so if you wake up in the night, you then go straight back to the eyes again and then keep going. In 10 out, press for the allies. 10 out. Press the Joel 10 out. Press for the shoulders, 10 out. Press for the hands. You cycle round and round. I didn't even remember. You're not trying to get to sleep here. This is a meditation. It's a mindfulness meditation because when your mind wanders you bring it back to the present moment. It's a relaxation meditation. You'll reconnecting with your physiology, becoming more aware of your physiological state learning. So relax. Mind wanders back to the present moment. Say slight following the breath. Just a more complex version I'm going to do now is just let our minds go free. Notice the breath, belly rising and falling. Tiny little movement. And if you wish in your mind and say the mantra, following the breath mantra, say, rising:
Speaker 3:
56:05
folding,:
Speaker 2:
56:52
and then focusing your attention on the sensation of the breath in the nostrils, especially the coolness of the in breath.:
Speaker 3:
57:05
Okay.:
Speaker 2:
57:06
What you can smell and taste and the sensation of being pushed into the ground and then your very own time gently return your attention to your surroundings.:
×

Listen to this podcast on