Exponential Talent

Feedback: What works and new frontiers

January 14, 2020 Dr. Avraham Kluger Season 1 Episode 2
Exponential Talent
Feedback: What works and new frontiers
Chapters
Exponential Talent
Feedback: What works and new frontiers
Jan 14, 2020 Season 1 Episode 2
Dr. Avraham Kluger

Prof. Avraham N. (Avi) Kluger is a faculty member at the Organizational Behavior Unit of the School of Business Administration at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.  His research on giving feedback demonstrated that it can be detrimental to performance and that even positive feedback can cause deterioration in performance.  To explain the puzzle of the detrimental effects of positive feedback on performance, he proposed, with Dina Van-Dijk, that positive feedback reduces motivation when people do things out of a desire (promotion focus) and that negative feedback increases motivation when people do things out of an obligation (prevention focus).  For these works on feedback, he received several awards, including (a) the 1996 Outstanding Paper in Organizational Behavior awarded by the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management (presented August 1997 in Boston) with Angelo DeNisi  (b) the first William A. Owens Scholarly Achievement Award for the best publication in field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology during 1996 by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (presented April 1998 in Dallas) with Angelo DeNisi and (c) The 2009 Award for Best Competitive Paper by the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management with Dina Van-Dijk.

Show Notes

Prof. Avraham N. (Avi) Kluger is a faculty member at the Organizational Behavior Unit of the School of Business Administration at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.  His research on giving feedback demonstrated that it can be detrimental to performance and that even positive feedback can cause deterioration in performance.  To explain the puzzle of the detrimental effects of positive feedback on performance, he proposed, with Dina Van-Dijk, that positive feedback reduces motivation when people do things out of a desire (promotion focus) and that negative feedback increases motivation when people do things out of an obligation (prevention focus).  For these works on feedback, he received several awards, including (a) the 1996 Outstanding Paper in Organizational Behavior awarded by the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management (presented August 1997 in Boston) with Angelo DeNisi  (b) the first William A. Owens Scholarly Achievement Award for the best publication in field of Industrial and Organizational Psychology during 1996 by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (presented April 1998 in Dallas) with Angelo DeNisi and (c) The 2009 Award for Best Competitive Paper by the Organizational Behavior Division of the Academy of Management with Dina Van-Dijk.